John Roat

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John Roat last won the day on April 17

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About John Roat

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  • Birthday 11/16/1942

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  1. "Fisk Marine & Colonial Life Underwriting Department has done what others will not do and that is to provide much needed individual coverages for commercial divers via the Divers Association". These benefits include short-term disability, on and off the job accident policy, life insurance, and a cancer program." I know we are not used to dealing with our own Insurance but our business, Commercial Diving as we have known it, is changing. We need to change with it. I have known Wil Sigl for several years and he does know our business and how to help us through the morass of acquiring our own insurance. Contact Wil Sigl wsigl@fiskusa.com Visit www.DisabilityCanHappen.org to learn more about the risk of disability and the benefits of having disability insurance. Visit www.disabilitycounter.org to view the number of working-age Americans who experienced a disabling injury or illness. Visit www.lifehappens.org to learn more about the benefits of having life insurance. Fisk Marine Int. is working with other providers to make this available outside North America stay tuned. https://fiskusa.com/blog/
  2. Prior to his death, our Board Member John Joly recognized that for working dive personnel the business was changing. With that in mind, he worked closely with Johnny Fisk & Wil Sig of Fisk Marine Insurance so dive personnel can get personal insurances independent of employers. "Fisk Marine & Colonial Life Underwriting Department has done what others will not do and that is to provide much needed individual coverages for commercial divers via the Divers Association". These benefits include short-term disability, on and off the job accident policy, life insurance, and a cancer program." I know we are not used to dealing with our own Insurance but our business, Commercial Diving as we have known it, is changing. We need to change with it. I have known Wil Sigl for several years and he does know our business and how to help us through the morass of acquiring our own insurance. Contact Wil Sigl wsigl@fiskusa.com Visit www.DisabilityCanHappen.org to learn more about the risk of disability and the benefits of having disability insurance. Visit www.disabilitycounter.org to view the number of working-age Americans who experienced a disabling injury or illness. Visit www.lifehappens.org to learn more about the benefits of having life insurance. Fisk Marine Int. is working with other providers to make this available outside North America stay tuned. https://fiskusa.com/blog/ This post has been promoted to an article
  3. Complete and up for sale! Anyone that is taking the Ocean Technologies Oxy-Arc Underwater Burning Course Rev.1 does not need to buy the manual. That and much more will be provided digitally. If you are not and buy the manual I will answers questions at the e-mail address in the manual. The See inside feature Amazone offers is now up and functioning See it here;
  4. All Videos are here
  5. I will be receiving the Printed Copies for Review on the 17th or 18th this month. Most divers will never have the chance to be taught to burn properly, they will learn in the field as most of us have. Hopeful the way I've put this manual together, they can buy it and learn how not to kill themselves, even when surrounded by a team that knows less than they do. The smart ones will note that my e-mail address is in this course, the smart ones will ask what they don't understand. The attached pictures are ones I created to help make the point about: Why the Drag method: IF YOU'RE IN FRONT OF THE CUT WHEN AN EXPLOSION HAPPENS; Oxy-Arc Burning can be done safely!
  6. I will be receiving the Printed Copies for Review on the 17th or 18th this month. Most divers will never have the chance to be taught to burn properly, they will learn in the field as most of us have. Hopeful the way I've put this manual together they can buy it and learn how not kill themselves, even when surround by a team that knows less then they do. The smart ones will note that my e-mail address is in this course, the smart ones will ask what they don't understand. The attached pictures are ones I created to help make the point about: Why the Drag method: IF YOU'RE IN FRONT OF THE CUT WHEN AN EXPLOSION HAPPENS; Oxy-Arc Burning can be done safely! This post has been promoted to an article
  7. I see everything but diver Skill training as always it is on the job!
  8. Everyone I showed immediately saw the value. The times (no vis.) you have had to argue with your customer because it is not like what the job plan or the As Built Prints say. The times (No Vis.) your fingers are telling you one thing and your head another. The times (no vis) you have a tie-in assembly and every valve has to be in the right position. You get the point! They are about 6 to 8 mouths being ready for anything but Scuba as their major market is Search & Rescue. Mainly done in scuba by Police and Fire Departments across the nation. Any Commercial Diving Company that works in Black Water and does not have this capability when offered to us: It's my guess, you snooze you lose, your competitor will. They way the Hammer Head is set up right now, just the diver sees and it's not recorded. They will be offering topside viewing and recording through the divers umbilical in the near future. I believe that every Diver Supervisor and Inspection Coordinator will want this on their job. Even divers will be happy to ware it when it applies. They have used it for topside Welding & Burning and it works but so far they have not tested it in black water. They will be doing that soon. Anyone interested, can get on VP of Sales Christina Baker's E-mail list, I am! christina@darkwatervision.com Their Web Page
  9. The Working Group Members: A member of the Board of Directors ADCI, a Diving Representative of IMCA, a Representative of The United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America, a Diving Company owner and a Dive School Owner, One Representative each from these Equipment Manufacturers: Oxylance Corporation, Broco Rankin Industries and Fire Wire Marine. We are shooting for a Recognized Underwater Oxy-Arc Burning Standard under the American Welding Society, AWS. Everyone has agreed it is well past due. Step 1) Up Grade: Ocean Technologies Oxy-Arc Underwater Burning Course. Completed. Step 2) Revise Burning Training for new Students at: Commercial Diving Technologies Safety Training will be exactly the same for new students as it will be for the Stand Alone Advanced Course. It will include set up and checking out equipment. A minimum score, of 80% to pass before further training in Oxy-Arc. They will have Basic familiarization with one type of exothermic rod on ½ plate. Their diploma from the school will reflect they passed the Oxy-Arc Burning Safety Training and completed basic familiarization with the rod used. Re-write Completed Step 3) Submit Revised Ocean Technologies Oxy-Arc Underwater Burning Course for all parties involved (See working Group). Completed. Step 4) Run new Safety Course for Students at: Commercial Diving Technologies.To Be Anounced Step 5) Run Stand Alone: Oxy-Arc Underwater Burning Training Course for Divers To Be Anounced Divers must have completed an Accredited Commercial Diving School Have a minimum of 30 Logged Commercial Dives. To begin the practical part of training with Exothermic, Tubular Steel and Swordfish Arc Cutting Electrode, You must have passed the Safety Training portion with a minimum of 80%, reviewed any incorrect answers and understand the correct answer. If we are successful in moving this forward toward a American Welding Society approved standard Commercial Diving Technologies & JCRoat Subject Matter Experts Services will run an Instructors Qualification Course. We will provide the written course, Instructors Notes and Videos that go with that course, to the Graduate Instructor/s. Interested parties can contact Sid Preskitt, Commercial Diving Technologies at 321-212-8550 or underseas6@yahoo.com for more information, Attention All Members of the Divers Association International: As this is a Board Member, John Roat's, effort at creating an Oxy-Arc Underwater Burning Certification the Association will post an internal poll of its members on the subject before voting to support this effort!
  10. Derek and All; The current problem is not over use of burning as it was in the old days. The problem currently is, it is only used, when some other method fails. Even when Burning would have been a safer way, such as: Setting the saw when with vessel movement is bouncing the saw around. The worst problem is, due to the OGPI 471 suggestions and them not quailing a course or any Instructors, for that course, there is no burner training/Cert. Yet it is on every job as back up or and emergency, such as trapped bell. The last place I want a diver with little or no experience with a cutting torch. I agree on cost being stuffed up the divers behind but if training is available, the Oil Company needing the service, will pay. Plus with this class: Just the Safety Portion that will be taught to divers going through dive school.." So my question would be which certification body would write up and approve the training establishments for such training" The ADCI has begun a review of the Course. and has said they will put the ADCI Stamp on the Course if it meets or exceeds their requirements and has qualified Instructors, it does. IMCA does not do that but I was told if it meets or exceeds IMCA D003 Guidelines for Oxy-Arc Cutting. we can state that on the course, it does. Both IMCA and The United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America, the National for our Divers Union, want a specified re-qualification/testing period. After the first: Stand Alone: Oxy-Arc Underwater Burning Training Course for Divers, I will run Instructors Qualification Courses. We will provide the written course, Instructors Notes and Videos that go with that course, to the Graduate Instructor/s. We are working on recording keeping. which will be done digitally. Written testing and Practical testing see attached, for this one both Instructor, Student and his cuts will be in the picture. It will take off fast, unless the Oil Companies need it some where, such the last time we had big hurricanes in the GOM. PS there will even be a power point to educate safety issues for customers that are educated to safe burning practices or Planers.
  11. Objective: Create an accepted Underwater Oxy-Arc Burning Certification Why: Because there is none and it is a misused tool. All we have today is suggested practices that have no standing under law. The Working Group Members: A member of the Board of Directors ADCI, a Diving Representative of IMCA, a Representative of The United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America, a Diving Company owner and a Dive School Owner, One Representative each from these Equipment Manufacturers: Oxylance Corporation, Broco Rankin Industries and Fire Wire Marine. We are shooting for a Recognized Underwater Oxy-Arc Burning Standard under the American Welding Society, AWS. Everyone has agreed it is well past due. Step 1) Up Grade: Ocean Technologies Oxy-Arc Underwater Burning Course. Completed. Step 2) Revise Burning Training for new Students at: Commercial Diving Technologies Safety Training will be exactly the same for new students as it will be for the Stand Alone Advanced Course. It will include set up and checking out equipment. A minimum score, of 80% to pass before further training in Oxy-Arc. They will have Basic familiarization with one type of exothermic rod on ½ plate. Their diploma from the school will reflect they passed the Oxy-Arc Burning Safety Training and completed basic familiarization with the rod used. Re-write Completed Step 3) Submit Revised Ocean Technologies Oxy-Arc Underwater Burning Course for all parties involved (See working Group). Completed. Step 4) Run new Safety Course for Students at: Commercial Diving Technologies.To Be Anounced Step 5) Run Stand Alone: Oxy-Arc Underwater Burning Training Course for Divers To Be Anounced Divers must have completed an Accredited Commercial Diving School Have a minimum of 30 Logged Commercial Dives. To begin the practical part of training with Exothermic, Tubular Steel and Swordfish Arc Cutting Electrode, You must have passed the Safety Training portion with a minimum of 80%, reviewed any incorrect answers and understand the correct answer. If we are successful in moving this forward toward a American Welding Society approved standard Commercial Diving Technologies & JCRoat Subject Matter Experts Services will run an Instructors Qualification Course. We will provide the written course, Instructors Notes and Videos that go with that course, to the Graduate Instructor/s. Interested parties can contact Sid Preskitt, Commercial Diving Technologies at 321-212-8550 or underseas6@yahoo.com for more information, Attention All Members of the Divers Association International: As this is a Board Member, John Roat's, effort at creating an Oxy-Arc Underwater Burning Certification the Association will post an internal poll of its members on the subject before voting to support this effort! This post has been promoted to an article
  12. Hal was this made front page?
  13. I will quote John Jenco here, a good diver to work with! “From a safety standpoint, the first line of defense is, and always has been, the diver. For the FNGs, a word of wisdom hard won: Commercial diving will NEVER be a SAFE profession; the best that can be hoped for is that YOU and your brothers in the diving community can make it SAFER. So BE ADVISED, commercial diving is not a game or thrilling profession. Understand that you can get killed or maimed doing this shit. Own that, and act accordingly. Every time. The second lines of defense are your tender, standby diver, bell partner, or topside supervisor, depending upon the situation. They are your ONLY backup safety system that you can rely upon when your shit goes sideways, so choose wisely. Taking a stand on WHO you will work with - and most importantly, who you won't - may save your life or someone else one day. Understand that as well. If you allow yourself to work with the lazy, careless, nervous, or unreliable, it is YOU that may have to pay the price for your lack of judgment someday, for not wanting to offend anyone. Finally, I know guys that died in 5' of water, and 500' of water. NO JOB is too simple to take safety for granted. If you want to survive in this profession, you had better learn to lock down all the BS and grab-ass and leave it on the beach. Get your frogman on from the time you leave the dock until the time you return. Assume nothing and take nothing for granted. Know your job and make certain that everyone else has done theirs as well, because if a tender leaves a fitting loose or doesn't top off the air compressor, or the rack operator doesn't have the right gas mix lined out for your dive, or the supervisor doesn't have the best communications setup with the deck crews, YOU are the one that will likely pay the price for any screw ups resulting therefrom. Own that. Rant over. “ John Jenco The things we can control are basic and I know you have been on jobs where basics are shoddy at best. 1) Hose Management both surface and saturation diving (We are sloppy about it) 2) Safety meetings, Diving Safety Drills, JSAs. (Informing everyone what is going on! I hate canned JSAs, if they don't do drills at least walk through it and have it planned out) 3) Surface Diving Chamber Operation. (proper vents, walking away from the chamber to wash divers gear and not looking at the diver through porthole) 4) Fully Dressed Stand By Diver (No Excuse) 5) LEARN TO SAY NO (quit being afraid to offend anyone) In short man or woman UP! I have never understood a person that has the courage to dive but not the courage to say NO!
  14. It's not on anyone else when one of us dies but us. It doesn't cost the company that cut corners on the their job plan, their life. It doesn't cost the company you're working for, that made the cheapest bid, to get the poorly planed job, their life. It is the guy doing the job and remember you took the job. I will quote John Jenco here a good diver to work with here: “From a safety standpoint, the first line of defense is, and always has been, the diver. For the FNGs, a word of wisdom hard won: Commercial diving will NEVER be a SAFE profession; the best that can be hoped for is that YOU and your brothers in the diving community can make it SAFER. So BE ADVISED, commercial diving is not a game or thrilling profession. Understand that you can get killed or maimed doing this shit. Own that, and act accordingly. Every time. The second lines of defense are your tender, standby diver, bell partner, or topside supervisor, depending upon the situation. They are your ONLY backup safety system that you can rely upon when your shit goes sideways, so choose wisely. Taking a stand on WHO you will work with - and most importantly, who you won't - may save your life or someone else one day. Understand that as well. If you allow yourself to work with the lazy, careless, nervous, or unreliable, it is YOU that may have to pay the price for your lack of judgment someday, for not wanting to offend anyone. Finally, I know guys that died in 5' of water, and 500' of water. NO JOB is too simple to take safety for granted. If you want to survive in this profession, you had better learn to lock down all the BS and grab-ass and leave it on the beach. Get your frogman on from the time you leave the dock until the time you return. Assume nothing and take nothing for granted. Know your job and make certain that everyone else has done theirs as well, because if a tender leaves a fitting loose or doesn't top off the air compressor, or the rack operator doesn't have the right gas mix lined out for your dive, or the supervisor doesn't have the best communications setup with the deck crews, YOU are the one that will likely pay the price for any screw ups resulting therefrom. Own that. Rant over. “ John Jenco The things we can control are basic and I know you have been on jobs where basics are shoddy at best. 1) Hose Management both surface and saturation diving (We are sloppy about it) 2) Safety meetings, Diving Safety Drills, JSAs. (Informing everyone what is going on! I hate canned JSAs, if they don't do drills at least walk through it and have it planned out) 3) Surface Diving Chamber Operation. (proper vents, walking away from the chamber to wash divers gear and not looking at the diver through porthole) 4) Fully Dressed Stand By Diver (No Excuse) 5) LEARN TO SAY NO (quit being afraid to offend anyone) In short man or woman UP! I have never understood a person that has the courage to dive but not the courage to say NO!