John Joly

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John Joly last won the day on November 26 2016

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About John Joly

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  • Birthday 03/02/1948

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  1. Thanks for your observation, blueshark! What you referred to is EXACTLY why it will help if ALL authority over diving operations are assigned to the USCG.
  2. Firstly, I want to wish each of you health and prosperity through the Holidays, whichever you celebrate, and in the future! PLEASE respond if you see the advisability of attempting to consolidate all authority over Commercial diving operations (in the USA and its territories) under the mission of the U.S. Coast Guard. The confusion and inadequate auditing/investigation/prosecution of diving operations will never be acceptable until this is done, in my opinion and that of many others with whom I have discussed this move. The USCG recently introduced a rate for USCG Diver - a rating which heretofore did not exist. This development will create career divers in the USCG and that will result in well-trained personnel who will be proficient in diving operations and safety. These personnel will be obvious candidates to undertake audits and investigations. Consolidating authority will eliminate the grey areas of oversight and expedite desirable improvements. "Bessie" is only interested in scientific and archeological diving and OSHA has a shown a lack of effectiveness, even interest in proactive involvement in enforcement of existing regulations. Injured divers and the survivors of divers killed at work have little backup and the attorneys they engage have to fight uphill in almost every instance. Active pursuit of the consolidation of authority will require some proactive effort by divers, support personnel, Contractors and law firms. This will not happen unless the first steps are taken. Details can be worked out. The Lawmakers who control appropriations must be educated in the need for such responsibility to be added to the USCG mission as it will require additional funding. The costs will be offset by reducing loss of life and injuries which become a financial burden to the government and diving contractors will save money because of reduced costs in assuring compliance and in legal fees. Attorney Bobby Delise has said more than once that he would like to be put out of the diving lawsuit business and he has made a fine career out of handling legal actions which result from injuries and fatalities to divers! I urge you to endorse this effort and too pitch in when it starts! Your FIRST act needs to be stating that you approve the effort to Consolidate Authority...
  3. If Mrs. Rupping has engaged Delise - or any other attorney - she has a good chance of getting her answers. The timing will be a negative aspect, I'm sure, although she has had SOME monies sent to her. I smell a rat when the Supervisor says it was his personal money he sent. This sounds very much like Mammoet is trying to insert a layer of plausible denial into the situation...
  4. IF anyone gets any details from the Spanish authorities, it MAY help in the future. My sympathy is deep & real here as I survived an explosive decompression on the Sampson Diver (owned/operated by Ocean Systems). My bell partner was standing in the trunk to the TUP when the seal broke between the bell and trunk (premature release of hydraulic clamps!). All survived (we went from 360 to 190 in a few seconds. The 4 divers in the DDC shut their hatch after losing 60 fsw. We worked for another 9 days and I suffered hits in both elbows during decompression. Mating mechanisms are much more reliable these days, thankfully!
  5. PLEASE speak out in favor of a monthly contribution to such a fund with the DA. We CAN make a difference! If YOU were stricken by accident or disease tomorrow could you cover all the expenses? Even with good insurance coverage it can be a real burden for the afflicted and their dependents. There has been little response endorsing the idea of such monthly contributions and I am inclined to think that we tend to be focused on our personal goals. Divers helping divers is the best shot at GETTING help when need arises... so RISE UP! Make known your willingness to make a small contribution monthly. With 1000 members putting $10 / month into such a fund, we can help many in need! ACT NOW
  6. Has anyone followed up on this issue? Babin needs a backup to his original complaint to OSHA....
  7. PARTICIPATE! Complaints and ideas are useless unless made in the effective situations. The USCG CFR updates are going to go public this year and it is the last chance for a while to be heard. DO IT! I advocate Consolidation of Authority over ALL diving operations under the USCG mission. ANYONE who has input for writing such a Bill to be presented to Congressional Members for consideration can contact me on my FB page or at john_joly@yahoo.com
  8. This situation is exactly why I endorse the consolidation of authority under ONLY the USCG mission. PSHA is ineffective - it has too broad a scope, commercial diving is lumped in with disparate activities, oversight is inadequate and investigations lack depth. The result is just what Mr.Babin has shared here. CONSOLIDATE AUTHORITY!! I am reaching out to several POSSIBLE resources for aid in drafting such legislation to present to numerous legislators as this is the only method I am aware of to get attention from said legislators. The Diving industry is not a priority with anyone outside the industry. The DA would do well to support this effort. Comments?
  9. This panel was an important session where the DIVERS, hell - ANYONE could get involved in the discussion regarding diving regulations. The attendance was SHIT! TEN TIMES the number were at the CRAWFISH BOIL. Does it take free beer to get you to be involved? This Association CAN do some real good in the Diving industry ONLY if YOU are active. There will be more opportunities so keep your eyes on this site! Safety has come a long way in the last 50 years or so and few have witnessed it - don't take for granted what you work with now and don't think for a minute that it will get better if DIVERS don't push for improvements! COMMUNICATION EDUCATION and REGULATION - those will make your job and the job of those who follow you safer and more productive!
  10. Brian Gilgeous, owner of a Diving Service in the UK, posted this on a FB page. His willingness to operate safely - which no doubt reduces his profit - is admirable. Here is his post: As a diver, when regulations began to be enforced more rigorously by the HSE in the 80's I and a lot of divers were skeptical and thought it was time wasting, and unnecessary and regarded it with a big ego and little true understanding as like all young guys we felt bullet proof. The companies (especially small inshore firms) had areas within which they fell short of the regulations, some turned a blind eye, others hid things, quite often the divers were complicit in this. As years passed a lot of these bad practices were dropped and it became unusual for a company to have bad kit or practices. When i did work for a "bad" company i would often bring my own hat or bailout system often selling it to the company when I left!! I once even brought an air panel to work!!Things got better in the UK and as i matured and gained experience I saw the value of regulations and codes of practice. As I moved into owning my own diving business, I took it as a point of pride to work towards having the best kit, systems and procedures that I could afford to buy or build, a slow process!! Nowadays I Price a job based as much on having the right kit, right team, right procedures, with no corners cut. The Diving At Work Regulations ensure a relatively even playing field when tendering as "shortcuts" to lower the price are often against regulations and bearing in mind the regulations stipulations of the clients "duty of care" fewer "bad companies" benefit (but of course there are always the odd exceptions). To my mind this is the benefit of regulations, codes of practice, proper risk assessments etc. It brings safer dives, and everyone gets to go home! My current area I'm working to improve is in the area of the standby diver, not only is he ready to go when needed (we already have that down well) but i am trying to educate my clients and teams that a safety exercise in diver casualty/ emergency recovery is included in a project plan & risk assessment and is repeatable with new team members, new site, changing conditions, new systems etc. I have had mixed success: the divers are happy to do it ( if paid) and some of the clients (enlightened ones) see the value of their compliance with duty of care and it does involve them in the project more (this has often been good for my business as the client knows I've got their back and we are reducing risk as much as possible. Some clients are not keen to see it on their jobs but we turn up as a better team because of our ethos. It is better for my lads to turn up as a practiced, efficient team rather than a divided group of individuals chasing the day rate (and im willing to pay to get that!). Inexperience, economic fears, and peer pressure at all levels in clients, dive teams and company management cause small (and large) areas of cutting corners and unnecessary risk. But there is a different route, that just requires a clear focus on regulations ( or getting them), getting the right kit, team and procedures in place... then selling it to the client... not easy.... but not as hard as you would think.... certainly easier than explaining in a court to a judge and a grieving family WHY the diver died. All this is my own humble opinion and I accept eveyrone has a different situation and economy... whatever you do brothers do it as safe as you can... This post has been promoted to an article
  11. As a diver, when regulations began to be enforced more rigorously by the HSE in the 80's I and a lot of divers were skeptical and thought it was time wasting, and unnecessary and regarded it with a big ego and little true understanding as like all young guys we felt bullet proof. The companies (especially small inshore firms) had areas within which they fell short of the regulations, some turned a blind eye, others hid things, quite often the divers were complicit in this. As years passed a lot of these bad practices were dropped and it became unusual for a company to have bad kit or practices. When i did work for a "bad" company i would often bring my own hat or bailout system often selling it to the company when I left!! I once even brought an air panel to work!!Things got better in the UK and as i matured and gained experience I saw the value of regulations and codes of practice. As I moved into owning my own diving business, I took it as a point of pride to work towards having the best kit, systems and procedures that I could afford to buy or build, a slow process!! Nowadays I Price a job based as much on having the right kit, right team, right procedures, with no corners cut. The Diving At Work Regulations ensure a relatively even playing field when tendering as "shortcuts" to lower the price are often against regulations and bearing in mind the regulations stipulations of the clients "duty of care" fewer "bad companies" benefit (but of course there are always the odd exceptions). To my mind this is the benefit of regulations, codes of practice, proper risk assessments etc. It brings safer dives, and everyone gets to go home! My current area I'm working to improve is in the area of the standby diver, not only is he ready to go when needed (we already have that down well) but i am trying to educate my clients and teams that a safety exercise in diver casualty/ emergency recovery is included in a project plan & risk assessment and is repeatable with new team members, new site, changing conditions, new systems etc. I have had mixed success: the divers are happy to do it ( if paid) and some of the clients (enlightened ones) see the value of their compliance with duty of care and it does involve them in the project more (this has often been good for my business as the client knows I've got their back and we are reducing risk as much as possible. Some clients are not keen to see it on their jobs but we turn up as a better team because of our ethos. It is better for my lads to turn up as a practiced, efficient team rather than a divided group of individuals chasing the day rate (and im willing to pay to get that!). Inexperience, economic fears, and peer pressure at all levels in clients, dive teams and company management cause small (and large) areas of cutting corners and unnecessary risk. But there is a different route, that just requires a clear focus on regulations ( or getting them), getting the right kit, team and procedures in place... then selling it to the client... not easy.... but not as hard as you would think.... certainly easier than explaining in a court to a judge and a grieving family WHY the diver died. All this is my own humble opinion and I accept eveyrone has a different situation and economy... whatever you do brothers do it as safe as you can...
  12. As Hal points out, the article in Underwater Contractor International details the Hyperbaric Rescue system available worldwide. Why, if major o& G operators entertain such a system elsewhere, would they NOT participate in some places (like the GOM)? The Spill Response vessels I mentioned above or other possibilities SHOULD be investigated and a ACTION should be taken to ensure the safe transfer of divers committed to saturation when a fire, explosion or hull breach occurs on the parent vessel. At the panel discussion during UI last month Peter Sieniewicz highlighted the resulting reduction in fatalities enjoyed in North Sea dive operations since awareness, IMCA guidance and governmental attention have been improved. These points are exactly why we have the DA and we should be promoting them actively throughout the world!
  13. Last Fall, I tried to get the GOM DSWG to reconsider a proposal to share the expense of 1 or 2 HRFs, Mark. They ignored the suggestion to consider it. With 5-6 operators and 5-6 contractors sharing costs for leasing (which included maintenance and manning), the connectors and consumables would be at contractor expense. Non-participating companies could pay a day rate for the HRF if ever needed. Bibby has a JV with Aqueos presently in the GOM and Bibby brought an HRF with the Sapphire and staged it at the port of convenience for the project.The same principle seems to remain - without regulatory pressure, expense outweighs safety. There is little saturation work in the GOM presently due to the downturn in price and this diminishes the immediacy of the need for such important preparations. Overcoming decades of ineffective regulations and corporate apathy is a steep hill to climb!
  14. In the GOM they currently have vessels staged around the coast for Spill Response. Adapting them for SPHL/HRC recovery is economically feasible. Staging 2-3 HRFs which can be reached within the necessary timeline is also feasible although at present no one has agreed to absorb the cost of buying/leasing or maintaining the necessary readiness of these. Also, HRCs are rapidly losing acceptance vers the SPHLs which are heavier. Perhaps the DA should discus this in depth and "take a position" to express to IMCA, ADCI, etcetera...
  15. It took many years to get the ball rolling with a rewrite of CFRs pertaining to diving and that still isn't official. The confusing overlap of OSHA and USCG authority and the failure to address the various situations divers work in has improvements at a snail's pace. European authorities are struggling with complexities also. The relatively small number of people in the industry and the lack of understanding by politicians and the public make it very difficult to even get attention for the issues related to diving safety. ONE improvement, I believe, would be to consolidate authority over ALL diving operations under the mission of the USCG. OSHA has been ineffective. To be fair, OSHA has regulatory obligations in almost EVERY job classification/industry in the USA and it should be a welcome reduction in their work load. MONEY is a major issue for a change such as I endorse. The USCG has a shrinking budget and oversight of diving operations will require more people and more administrative work and that costs money. If you see the sense in this, WRITE YOUR REPRESENTATIVES in Congress. Get them asking about this among themselves. I'm trying to get a "Bill" composed to put the issue on the agenda in D.C. even though it will be prioritized somewhere below squirrel studies or another obscure consideration. IF you care, DO something! If divers don't TRY to improve the safety in the industry, WHO WILL? If you've been in diving for any length of time, you know divers who have died or been seriously injured in preventable incidents. WHY SHOULD IT GO ON?