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    John Roat

      Best of Show for me this year at Underwater Intervention is Dark Water Visions, The Hammer Head. I was walking around between meetings just looking at what the different booths had to offer. I've been around long enough that I don't get excited by most new innovations. The instant I put the Hammer Head on my thought was: “I would love to burn in black water with this!” After that first thought a whole list of times I was diving or supervising I would have loved to have it came to mind. I started running around like a diver just out of school grabbing guys like Donald Dryden, Les Gorski and Sid Preskitt: “You gotta see this!

      Everyone I showed immediately saw the value. The times (no vis.) you have had to argue with your customer because it is not like what the job plan or the As Built Prints say. The times (No Vis.) your fingers are telling you one thing and your head another. The times (no vis) you have a tie-in assembly and every valve has to be in the right position. You get the point!
     
      They are about 6 to 8 mouths being ready for anything but Scuba as their major market is Search & Rescue. Mainly done in scuba by Police and Fire Departments across the nation. Any Commercial Diving Company that works in Black Water and does not have this capability when offered to us:  It's my guess, you snooze you lose, your competitor will. They way the Hammer Head is set up right now, just the diver sees and it's not recorded. They will be offering topside viewing and recording through the divers umbilical in the near future.
     
      I believe that every Diver Supervisor and Inspection Coordinator will want this on their job. Even divers will be happy to ware it when it applies. They have used it for topside Welding & Burning and it works but so far they have not tested it in black water. They will be doing that soon. Anyone interested, can get on VP of Sales Christina Baker's E-mail list, I am!   christina@darkwatervision.com
     
    Their Web Page
     
    John Roat

    SafetyIssue1.jpg

    Objective: Create an accepted Underwater Oxy-Arc Burning Certification

    Why: Because there is none and it is a misused tool. All we have today is suggested practices that have no standing under law.

    The Working Group Members:
    A member of the Board of Directors ADCI, a Diving Representative of IMCA, a Representative of The United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America, a Diving Company owner and a Dive School Owner, One Representative each from these Equipment Manufacturers: Oxylance Corporation, Broco Rankin Industries and Fire Wire Marine. We are shooting for a Recognized Underwater Oxy-Arc Burning Standard under the American Welding Society, AWS. Everyone has agreed it is well past due.
     
    Step 1) Up Grade: Ocean Technologies Oxy-Arc Underwater Burning Course. Completed.
    Step 2) Revise Burning Training for new Students at: Commercial Diving Technologies
    Safety Training will be exactly the same for new students as it will be for the Stand Alone Advanced Course. It will include set up and checking out equipment. A minimum score, of 80% to pass before further training in Oxy-Arc. They will have Basic familiarization with one type of exothermic rod on ½ plate. Their diploma from the school will reflect they passed the Oxy-Arc Burning Safety Training and completed basic familiarization with the rod used. Re-write Completed Step 3) Submit Revised Ocean Technologies Oxy-Arc Underwater Burning Course for all parties involved (See working Group). Completed.
    Step 4) Run new Safety Course for Students at: Commercial Diving Technologies.To Be Anounced
    Step 5) Run Stand Alone: Oxy-Arc Underwater Burning Training Course for Divers To Be Anounced
    Divers must have completed an Accredited Commercial Diving School
    Have a minimum of 30 Logged Commercial Dives.
    To begin the practical part of training with Exothermic, Tubular Steel and Swordfish Arc Cutting Electrode, You must have passed the Safety Training portion with a minimum of 80%, reviewed any incorrect answers and understand the correct answer.
    If we are successful in moving this forward toward a American Welding Society approved standard Commercial Diving Technologies & JCRoat Subject Matter Experts Services will run an Instructors Qualification Course. We will provide the written course, Instructors Notes and Videos that go with that course, to the Graduate Instructor/s. Interested parties can contact Sid Preskitt, Commercial Diving Technologies at 321-212-8550 or underseas6@yahoo.com for more information,
     
    Attention All Members of the Divers Association International: As this is a Board Member, John Roat's, effort at creating an Oxy-Arc Underwater Burning Certification the Association will post an internal poll of its members on the subject before voting to support this effort!
     
    John Roat

    gallery_315_20_9440.jpg

    It's not on anyone else when one of us dies but us. It doesn't cost the company that cut corners on the their job plan, their life. It doesn't cost the company you're working for, that  made the cheapest bid, to get the poorly planed job, their life. It is the guy doing the job and remember you took the job.

    I will quote John Jenco here, a good diver to work with!  “From a safety standpoint, the first line of defense is, and always has been, the diver. For the FNGs, a word of wisdom hard won: Commercial diving will NEVER be a SAFE profession; the best that can be hoped for is that YOU and your brothers in the diving community can make it SAFER. So BE ADVISED, commercial diving is not a game or thrilling profession. Understand that you can get killed or maimed doing this shit. Own that, and act accordingly. Every time.
     

    The second lines of defense are your tender, standby diver, bell partner, or topside supervisor, depending upon the situation. They are your ONLY backup safety system that you can rely upon when your shit goes sideways, so choose wisely. Taking a stand on WHO you will work with - and most importantly, who you won't - may save your life or someone else one day. Understand that as well. If you allow yourself to work with the lazy, careless, nervous, or unreliable, it is YOU that may have to pay the price for your lack of judgment someday, for not wanting to offend anyone.

    Finally, I know guys that died in 5' of water, and 500' of water. NO JOB is too simple to take safety for granted. If you want to survive in this profession, you had better learn to lock down all the BS and grab-ass and leave it on the beach. Get your frogman on from the time you leave the dock until the time you return.

    Assume nothing and take nothing for granted. Know your job and make certain that everyone else has done theirs as well, because if a tender leaves a fitting loose or doesn't top off the air compressor, or the rack operator doesn't have the right gas mix lined out for your dive, or the supervisor doesn't have the best communications setup with the deck crews, YOU are the one that will likely pay the price for any screw ups resulting therefrom. Own that.

    Rant over. “ John Jenco
     
    The things we can control are basic and I know you have been on jobs where basics are shoddy at best.
    1)  Hose Management both surface and saturation diving (We are sloppy about it)
    2) Safety meetings, Diving Safety Drills, JSAs. (Informing everyone what is going on! I hate canned JSAs, if they don't do drills at least walk through it and have it planned out)
    3) Surface Diving Chamber Operation. (proper vents, walking away from the chamber to wash divers gear and not looking at the diver through porthole)
    4) Fully Dressed Stand By Diver (No Excuse)
    5) LEARN TO SAY NO   (quit being afraid to offend anyone)
     
    In short man or woman UP! I have never understood a person that has the courage to dive but not the courage to say NO!
     
    Association

    LogoBurners.jpg

    Commercial Diving Technologies, LLC (CDT) is engaged in talks with John Roat, JCRoat Subject Matter Expert Services to develop a stand alone underwater burning training course.

    There would be two vital areas of importance that would be the focus of this undertaking;
     
    1. Safety
    2. Competency
     
    Training would be conducted at the DCBC accredited CDT commercial diver training facility in Hudson FL. and consist of two primary components;
     
    1. Underwater burning certification
    2. Underwater Oxy-Arc Burning Instructor certification. (This would be required to conduct training of personal)
     
    John Roat and CDT will be holding meetings during the upcoming UI Conference in New Orleans. If those attending the meetings agree this course will be offered to other Accredited Diver Training Schools. Interested parties can contact Sid Preskitt, Commercial Diving Technologies at 321-212-8550 or underseas6@yahoo.com for more information.
     
    You can download a short Video overview by clicking on Burning:    BurningTraining.wmv
    Association

    gallery_315_20_9440.jpgThe Divers Association urges everyone, world wide to sign this petition: Protect Commercial Divers' Lives Again action on the revision of regulation has been postponed. No result in more then 18 years! CHANGES TO CFRs ARE IN BUREAUCRATIC LIMBO!

    Still no action The Divers Association urges every interested person to contact the Coast Guard, their governmental representatives and every active company in the Diving industry. The anticipated changes won’t revolutionize anything. All of the proposals are already accepted or exceeded by the professional associations in the United States and IMCA.  
    Mr. Jeffery G. Lantz
    Director of Commercial Regulations & Standards (CG-5PS)
    U.S. Coast Guard Headquarters
    2703 Martin Luther King Jr. Ave SE, STOP 7126
    Washington, DC 20593-7126
    202-372-1351 E-Mail Jeffry G. Lantz <Jeffrey.G.Lantz@uscg.mil>
     
    Mr. Ken Smith Project Manager
    Department of Homeland Security
    U.S. Coast Guard
    Commandant (CG-OES-2), 2703 Martin Luther King Jr. Avenue SE.,
    STOP 7509, Washington, DC 20593-7509
    Phone: 202 372-1413
    E-Mail: ken.a.smith@uscg.mil
    For United Citizens you will find your Representative here Just enter you zip code it wll give you the hotlink to their Web page
     I am telling mine this " No result in more then 18 years! CHANGES TO CFRs ARE IN BUREAUCRATIC LIMBO and causing the loss of divers lives. You can find evidence of the lack of action here"
     
    Association

    For those attending Underwater Intervention this year do not miss the best gathering of divers this end of the Universe. This year joining Fisk Marine Insurance as sponsors are Oxylance & BayTech & VideoRay

    Fisk_CommercialDive-1-146x300.png

    As usual ADCI Current Cardholders are admitted to the display floor no charge. If you have your card make sure to bring it!  You will find all information on presentations, hotels and sign up for Underwater Intervention 2017 here!

    Mark Longstreath
    2017 has started with two fatalities in the diving industry, both in Spain.
     
    The first was on January 5th was a diver named Jesus Ramon Vazquez Tojeiro, who was carrying out a dive to recover red coral, commonly used in jewelry that is sold in China. As the amount of red coral declines, divers have to go deeper to find it. This diver died while carrying out a SCUBA Mixed Gas dive. His body was recovered 9 days later on January 14th.
     
    The second diver died on 25th January. His name was Agustin Ortega. Currently we know very little about how he died, just that he was working at the Valdelentisco desalination plant near El Mojón in Mazarrón.
     
    It is widely recognised that Spain has one of the worst safety records in the world, and that their diving regulatory structure is antiquated, and totally inadequate for the diving industry. Lets hope that 2017 can be the start of a total restructuring of the Spanish diving regulations, as they sorely need it.
     
     
    Augustin Ortega
     

     
     
     
    John Joly
    Firstly, I want to wish each of you health and prosperity through the Holidays, whichever you celebrate, and in the future!
    PLEASE respond if you see the advisability of attempting to consolidate all authority over Commercial diving operations (in the USA and its territories) under the mission of the U.S. Coast Guard. The confusion and inadequate auditing/investigation/prosecution of diving operations will never be acceptable until this is done, in my opinion and that of many others with whom I have discussed this move.
    The USCG recently introduced a rate for USCG Diver - a rating which heretofore did not exist. This development will create career divers in the USCG and that will result in well-trained personnel who will be proficient in diving operations and safety. These personnel will be obvious candidates to undertake audits and investigations. Consolidating authority will eliminate the grey areas of oversight and expedite desirable improvements. "Bessie" is only interested in scientific and archeological diving and OSHA has a shown a lack of effectiveness, even interest in proactive involvement in enforcement of existing regulations. Injured divers and the survivors of divers killed at work have little backup and the attorneys they engage have to fight uphill in almost every instance.
    Active pursuit of the consolidation of authority will require some proactive effort by divers, support personnel, Contractors and law firms. This will not happen unless the first steps are taken. Details can be worked out. The Lawmakers who control appropriations must be educated in the need for such responsibility to be added to the USCG mission as it will require additional funding. The costs will be offset by reducing loss of life and injuries which become a financial burden to the government and diving contractors will save money because of reduced costs in assuring compliance and in legal fees. Attorney Bobby Delise has said more than once that he would like to be put out of the diving lawsuit business and he has made a fine career out of handling legal actions which result from injuries and fatalities to divers!
    I urge you to endorse this effort and too pitch in when it starts! Your FIRST act needs to be stating that you approve the effort to Consolidate Authority...
    Association
    The following letter has been sent by the wife of Luke Rupping in the hope of getting closure for herself and her daughter. She has asked that the Divers Association publish the letter and Annexures.
     
    The letter has not been edited or corrected in any way.   
     
    TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN
     
    BACKGROUND
    On the afternoon of January 23, 1991, the Amuriyah, an 82,000-tonne Iraqi oil tanker sunk near Bubiyan Island off the coast of Iraq during Operation Desert Storm. In 2014 it was decided the tanker needed to be removed because it was within the tanker turning circle of a proposed mooring point at Iraq’s Al Basrah Oil Terminal, through which 97percent of Iraq’s crude oil is exported. The sunken vessel is blocking construction of a vital mooring point for the export of crude oil from SMP-5. Oil sales make up 95 percent of Iraqi government revenues, so anything – such as a sunken ship – that blocks additional oil exports must be removed. On the afternoon of January 23, 1991, the Amuriyah, an 82,000-tonne Iraqi oil tanker sunk near Bubiyan Island off the coast of Iraq during Operation Desert Storm. In 2014 it was decided the tanker needed to be removed. To remove the tanker, the 285 meter long hull needed to be cut up into manageable pieces.
     
    To view more, go to: http://www.thediversassociation.com/index.php?/forums/topic/753-luke-rupping-kuwait-2014/
     
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  • Latest Incident Follow Up Posts

    • Thanks very much for posting this update Mark. We are very confident of safety improvement within this industry as a result of the inquest, and if not then we will continue to campaign. I am sure some employers do not appreciate the value of a life let alone an individuals right to a safe workplace.
    • Taken from this post:      Hello Hal, below a translation from the newspaper El Siglo:   Elmer Quintero Cedeño
      Elmer.quintero@elsiglo.com

      Sources said that divers were trapped and sucked by the current

      TRAGEDY

      Two divers died after being sucked by a sewer at a time when they were cleaning a canal at the Gualaca Hydroelectric Power Plant of Celsia Centroamérica, S.A., in Gualaca, Chiriquí.

      The facts were recorded at approximately 12:40 pm yesterday afternoon.

      Citizens Roderick Araúz, 35, and Jose Garcia, 43, were hired by the hydroelectric company to carry out work as divers and clean the canal that reorients the waters of the River Estí and, while carrying out these tasks, were dragged by the Current through a sewer that I push them to another channel.

      Ambulances of the firemen of Gualaca and other security institutions were transferred to the place, and the staff performed cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) maneuvers, but the effort was in vain.

      In the same way police units were presented, of the Sinaproc, Firemen, DIJ, Criminalistics and the Municipality of Gualaca.

      The Personería carried out the lifting of the corpses of these two people.

      Roderick Araúz was captain of the Volunteer Fire Department at Gualaca Station and worked as a firefighter at Enrique Malek Airport in David.

      According to a statement from the company Celsia Centroamérica, the two divers were hired by the contractor Interpa Holding Corporation, S.A, which was routinely called to carry out works on the canals.

      It was indicated that, as soon as the accident was known, the emergency plan was activated and representatives of Celsia Central America contacted the corresponding authorities to provide immediate attention.

      "At the moment the company is providing the necessary support both to the relatives of the deceased and to the authorities, in order to clarify the facts and determine the causes of this unfortunate accident," the company said in a statement. End of translation from El Siglo Newspaper.   Facts that I obtained: The divers were Scuba Divers, the "Contractor" company was owned by one of the divers. They were using scuba at the moment of the incident. One of the reasons this things happen here is because there is no law for dive operations. A group of professionals presented a law that will be discussed by senators in January 2017 (we been trying for years but politicians always find the way to block it). Will keep you updated on any advance regarding the dive law. Gabriel  
    • There is an article about the high rate of deaths in Spain here: http://www.elconfidencial.com/espana/2017-03-02/buzos-profesionales-precariedad_1340942/?utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=BotoneraWeb   It needs google translate unless you are a Spanish speaker, but seems to how that Agustin Ortega died of a heart attack. I may be getting cynical, but that seems to be used as a reason for divers dying rather a lot.