• First Two Fatalities in 2017

    2017 has started with two fatalities in the diving industry, both in Spain.

     

    The first was on January 5th was a diver named Jesus Ramon Vazquez Tojeiro, who was carrying out a dive to recover red coral, commonly used in jewelry that is sold in China. As the amount of red coral declines, divers have to go deeper to find it. This diver died while carrying out a SCUBA Mixed Gas dive. His body was recovered 9 days later on January 14th.

     

    The second diver died on 25th January. His name was Agustin Ortega. Currently we know very little about how he died, just that he was working at the Valdelentisco desalination plant near El Mojón in Mazarrón.

     

    It is widely recognised that Spain has one of the worst safety records in the world, and that their diving regulatory structure is antiquated, and totally inadequate for the diving industry. Lets hope that 2017 can be the start of a total restructuring of the Spanish diving regulations, as they sorely need it.

     

     

    Augustin Ortega

     

    Agustin Ortega.jpg

     

     

     


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    Professional Diving Safety is based on the behavior of Power, know and want to work safely
    We are angered by the continuous accidents in our activity and we ask ourselves among other questions why we assume that risk? Why do we dive well and not safely? We could fill a sea of justifications and we would not justify anything at all.
    Personally I do not think that it is only due to the bad regulation of a country, we are ourselves that opted to carry out unsecured operations. Until we assume our responsibility, accidents will continue.
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    I had though that the petition to the European Diving Technical Committee a few years ago had resulted in both Spain and Italy promising to implement a safe commercial diving culture under LAW formulated by Spain. That was several years ago! Promises, Promises, Promises from the coffee shop!

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     A few years back? that is so like yesterday when it comes to Government agencies committing to “do the right thing”. Here in the US the USCG has been promising to create that safer work place now for twenty years. Guess it does not matter which side of the pond you are on, things just stay the same. Rest in peace Jesus and Agustin, may you be the last to die at the end of a hose this year or ever

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