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  3. Thanks very much for posting this update Mark. We are very confident of safety improvement within this industry as a result of the inquest, and if not then we will continue to campaign. I am sure some employers do not appreciate the value of a life let alone an individuals right to a safe workplace.
  4. Taken from this post: Hello Hal, below a translation from the newspaper El Siglo: Elmer Quintero CedeñoElmer.quintero@elsiglo.comSources said that divers were trapped and sucked by the currentTRAGEDYTwo divers died after being sucked by a sewer at a time when they were cleaning a canal at the Gualaca Hydroelectric Power Plant of Celsia Centroamérica, S.A., in Gualaca, Chiriquí.The facts were recorded at approximately 12:40 pm yesterday afternoon.Citizens Roderick Araúz, 35, and Jose Garcia, 43, were hired by the hydroelectric company to carry out work as divers and clean the canal that reorients the waters of the River Estí and, while carrying out these tasks, were dragged by the Current through a sewer that I push them to another channel.Ambulances of the firemen of Gualaca and other security institutions were transferred to the place, and the staff performed cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) maneuvers, but the effort was in vain.In the same way police units were presented, of the Sinaproc, Firemen, DIJ, Criminalistics and the Municipality of Gualaca.The Personería carried out the lifting of the corpses of these two people.Roderick Araúz was captain of the Volunteer Fire Department at Gualaca Station and worked as a firefighter at Enrique Malek Airport in David.According to a statement from the company Celsia Centroamérica, the two divers were hired by the contractor Interpa Holding Corporation, S.A, which was routinely called to carry out works on the canals.It was indicated that, as soon as the accident was known, the emergency plan was activated and representatives of Celsia Central America contacted the corresponding authorities to provide immediate attention."At the moment the company is providing the necessary support both to the relatives of the deceased and to the authorities, in order to clarify the facts and determine the causes of this unfortunate accident," the company said in a statement. End of translation from El Siglo Newspaper. Facts that I obtained: The divers were Scuba Divers, the "Contractor" company was owned by one of the divers. They were using scuba at the moment of the incident. One of the reasons this things happen here is because there is no law for dive operations. A group of professionals presented a law that will be discussed by senators in January 2017 (we been trying for years but politicians always find the way to block it). Will keep you updated on any advance regarding the dive law. Gabriel
  5. There is an article about the high rate of deaths in Spain here: http://www.elconfidencial.com/espana/2017-03-02/buzos-profesionales-precariedad_1340942/?utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=BotoneraWeb It needs google translate unless you are a Spanish speaker, but seems to how that Agustin Ortega died of a heart attack. I may be getting cynical, but that seems to be used as a reason for divers dying rather a lot.
  6. Once it has been developed to the point of being surface monitored, I can see the oil companies requiring this technology for all asset inspections in zero visibility. The sales people ought to be marketing this to Chevron, Shell, Exxon-Mobil, BP, Total, Aramco and the rest of the lot just as soon as they can get the imagery onto a surface monitor. This looks like breakthrough technology to me.
  7. Everyone I showed immediately saw the value. The times (no vis.) you have had to argue with your customer because it is not like what the job plan or the As Built Prints say. The times (No Vis.) your fingers are telling you one thing and your head another. The times (no vis) you have a tie-in assembly and every valve has to be in the right position. You get the point! They are about 6 to 8 mouths being ready for anything but Scuba as their major market is Search & Rescue. Mainly done in scuba by Police and Fire Departments across the nation. Any Commercial Diving Company that works in Black Water and does not have this capability when offered to us: It's my guess, you snooze you lose, your competitor will. They way the Hammer Head is set up right now, just the diver sees and it's not recorded. They will be offering topside viewing and recording through the divers umbilical in the near future. I believe that every Diver Supervisor and Inspection Coordinator will want this on their job. Even divers will be happy to ware it when it applies. They have used it for topside Welding & Burning and it works but so far they have not tested it in black water. They will be doing that soon. Anyone interested, can get on VP of Sales Christina Baker's E-mail list, I am! christina@darkwatervision.com Their Web Page
  8. The Working Group Members: A member of the Board of Directors ADCI, a Diving Representative of IMCA, a Representative of The United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America, a Diving Company owner and a Dive School Owner, One Representative each from these Equipment Manufacturers: Oxylance Corporation, Broco Rankin Industries and Fire Wire Marine. We are shooting for a Recognized Underwater Oxy-Arc Burning Standard under the American Welding Society, AWS. Everyone has agreed it is well past due. Step 1) Up Grade: Ocean Technologies Oxy-Arc Underwater Burning Course. Completed. Step 2) Revise Burning Training for new Students at: Commercial Diving Technologies Safety Training will be exactly the same for new students as it will be for the Stand Alone Advanced Course. It will include set up and checking out equipment. A minimum score, of 80% to pass before further training in Oxy-Arc. They will have Basic familiarization with one type of exothermic rod on ½ plate. Their diploma from the school will reflect they passed the Oxy-Arc Burning Safety Training and completed basic familiarization with the rod used. Re-write Completed Step 3) Submit Revised Ocean Technologies Oxy-Arc Underwater Burning Course for all parties involved (See working Group). Completed. Step 4) Run new Safety Course for Students at: Commercial Diving Technologies.To Be Anounced Step 5) Run Stand Alone: Oxy-Arc Underwater Burning Training Course for Divers To Be Anounced Divers must have completed an Accredited Commercial Diving School Have a minimum of 30 Logged Commercial Dives. To begin the practical part of training with Exothermic, Tubular Steel and Swordfish Arc Cutting Electrode, You must have passed the Safety Training portion with a minimum of 80%, reviewed any incorrect answers and understand the correct answer. If we are successful in moving this forward toward a American Welding Society approved standard Commercial Diving Technologies & JCRoat Subject Matter Experts Services will run an Instructors Qualification Course. We will provide the written course, Instructors Notes and Videos that go with that course, to the Graduate Instructor/s. Interested parties can contact Sid Preskitt, Commercial Diving Technologies at 321-212-8550 or underseas6@yahoo.com for more information, Attention All Members of the Divers Association International: As this is a Board Member, John Roat's, effort at creating an Oxy-Arc Underwater Burning Certification the Association will post an internal poll of its members on the subject before voting to support this effort!
  9. Derek and All; The current problem is not over use of burning as it was in the old days. The problem currently is, it is only used, when some other method fails. Even when Burning would have been a safer way, such as: Setting the saw when with vessel movement is bouncing the saw around. The worst problem is, due to the OGPI 471 suggestions and them not quailing a course or any Instructors, for that course, there is no burner training/Cert. Yet it is on every job as back up or and emergency, such as trapped bell. The last place I want a diver with little or no experience with a cutting torch. I agree on cost being stuffed up the divers behind but if training is available, the Oil Company needing the service, will pay. Plus with this class: Just the Safety Portion that will be taught to divers going through dive school.." So my question would be which certification body would write up and approve the training establishments for such training" The ADCI has begun a review of the Course. and has said they will put the ADCI Stamp on the Course if it meets or exceeds their requirements and has qualified Instructors, it does. IMCA does not do that but I was told if it meets or exceeds IMCA D003 Guidelines for Oxy-Arc Cutting. we can state that on the course, it does. Both IMCA and The United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America, the National for our Divers Union, want a specified re-qualification/testing period. After the first: Stand Alone: Oxy-Arc Underwater Burning Training Course for Divers, I will run Instructors Qualification Courses. We will provide the written course, Instructors Notes and Videos that go with that course, to the Graduate Instructor/s. We are working on recording keeping. which will be done digitally. Written testing and Practical testing see attached, for this one both Instructor, Student and his cuts will be in the picture. It will take off fast, unless the Oil Companies need it some where, such the last time we had big hurricanes in the GOM. PS there will even be a power point to educate safety issues for customers that are educated to safe burning practices or Planers.
  10. Hi John, All credit to making this happen, but I have reservations that the course would only benefit the schools and not the divers working in the industry. Divers have been hard hit by the reduction of work and still expected to maintain certain diving certification to keep in work. Therefore I’m against anything that would impose any additional cost to the diver rather than the diving contractor. So providing the diving contractor is paying for the training that would be OK. I now work only in the North Sea and we very rarely use any hot working cutting equipment apart for cutting out the odd bracket or stuck bolt as all the clients prefer cold cutting methods which in some cases are a lot quicker and safer. We actually used it for the first time in 6 years on the last job for about an hour’s work as it was the only method of work that would suffice. God knows when I’ll ever see it used again. They tried to impose an underwater lifting and rigging certificate for divers here in the North Sea which I viewed with contempt for the course made no recognition to prior experience. I won the day as I would only support the issue if the certification came under a recognised educational route with a recognised trade organisation which would have meant the employers and the training schools having to pay a body to write up and get approved as a considerable cost. Once that hit the table they dropped the idea. So my question would be which certification body would write up and approve the training establishments for such training and would the certification within a certified trade body be transferable within that educational bodies existing qualification structures. Derek Moore
  11. No, John it has not been made a front page article.
  12. Objective: Create an accepted Underwater Oxy-Arc Burning Certification Why: Because there is none and it is a misused tool. All we have today is suggested practices that have no standing under law. The Working Group Members: A member of the Board of Directors ADCI, a Diving Representative of IMCA, a Representative of The United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America, a Diving Company owner and a Dive School Owner, One Representative each from these Equipment Manufacturers: Oxylance Corporation, Broco Rankin Industries and Fire Wire Marine. We are shooting for a Recognized Underwater Oxy-Arc Burning Standard under the American Welding Society, AWS. Everyone has agreed it is well past due. Step 1) Up Grade: Ocean Technologies Oxy-Arc Underwater Burning Course. Completed. Step 2) Revise Burning Training for new Students at: Commercial Diving Technologies Safety Training will be exactly the same for new students as it will be for the Stand Alone Advanced Course. It will include set up and checking out equipment. A minimum score, of 80% to pass before further training in Oxy-Arc. They will have Basic familiarization with one type of exothermic rod on ½ plate. Their diploma from the school will reflect they passed the Oxy-Arc Burning Safety Training and completed basic familiarization with the rod used. Re-write Completed Step 3) Submit Revised Ocean Technologies Oxy-Arc Underwater Burning Course for all parties involved (See working Group). Completed. Step 4) Run new Safety Course for Students at: Commercial Diving Technologies.To Be Anounced Step 5) Run Stand Alone: Oxy-Arc Underwater Burning Training Course for Divers To Be Anounced Divers must have completed an Accredited Commercial Diving School Have a minimum of 30 Logged Commercial Dives. To begin the practical part of training with Exothermic, Tubular Steel and Swordfish Arc Cutting Electrode, You must have passed the Safety Training portion with a minimum of 80%, reviewed any incorrect answers and understand the correct answer. If we are successful in moving this forward toward a American Welding Society approved standard Commercial Diving Technologies & JCRoat Subject Matter Experts Services will run an Instructors Qualification Course. We will provide the written course, Instructors Notes and Videos that go with that course, to the Graduate Instructor/s. Interested parties can contact Sid Preskitt, Commercial Diving Technologies at 321-212-8550 or underseas6@yahoo.com for more information, Attention All Members of the Divers Association International: As this is a Board Member, John Roat's, effort at creating an Oxy-Arc Underwater Burning Certification the Association will post an internal poll of its members on the subject before voting to support this effort! This post has been promoted to an article
  13. Hal was this made front page?
  14. A gas release like that would turn any sat job to shit.
  15. Shit sat job..
  16. Sat Job
  17. Paspaley pearl diver Jarrod Hampton's family seeking answers as inquest into death set down for May The family of a Victorian pearl diver who died off WA's north-west coast has welcomed the scheduling of an inquest five years on, saying lives continued to be put at risk by alleged dubious safety practices. Jarrod Hampton was working as a drift diver for the Paspaley Pearling Company in April 2012 when he got into trouble in the water off Eighty Mile Beach. By the time he was pulled aboard his boat, its crew was unable to revive him. A 10-day coronial inquest has now been set down to run in Perth in May, with Mr Hampton's parents Robyn and Tony and their two other sons planning to travel from their home in Victoria to attend. Ms Hampton welcomed the announcement of the inquest and said she felt "very optimistic". "We've waited many years to get that news. There was a time we thought we weren't going to get an inquest," she said. "We will learn what they did do and what they perhaps should have done, and what maybe should have been in place." Ms Hampton said the doubt surrounding just how her son died had added to the family's distress. "We only live with the memories of him, and we miss him, and the dynamics of our family have changed forever ... we're overwhelmed by his loss," she said. Family criticises 'archaic' regulations In the wake of the death, safety watchdog WorkSafe charged Paspaley with failing to provide a safe work environment, to which the company pleaded guilty and was fined $60,000. The Broome District Court heard it took the Paspaley crew between five and 10 minutes to bring Mr Hampton onto a boat, at which time efforts to revive him were unsuccessful. However, no charge was ever laid relation to Mr Hampton's death, and there has been no suggestion the company was responsible. The Hampton family has been scathing of the relatively loose regulation of the pearling industry and the lack of change in the wake of their son's death. "There's been no significant improvements, nothing done that would protect someone's life," Ms Hampton said. Pearl diving is regulated under the general diving regulations rather than commercial diving regulations, and Ms Hampton said the inquest would provide an opportunity to have that reviewed. "All the pearl divers must get a commercial fishing licence, so the WA state does see their job as commercial fishing, and yet they've managed to maintain a very archaic diving regulation, the general diving regulations." Review underway but progress unclear Both Paspaley and the WA Pearl Producers Association have defended the industry's safety record, pointing out that deaths are very rare and saying improvements had been made in recent years. The State Government said in the wake of Mr Hampton's death that it would review safety regulations, but it appears there has been little progress. A working group was formed by WorkSafe after court proceedings finished in 2015 to assess what industry changes were needed. The ABC understands the group has met several times, and is looking at whether the existing non-enforceable industry code of practice needs to be upgraded to a commission code. Diving guidelines are also being reviewed nationally, a process Worksafe has said could have implications for the training requirements in WA's pearling industry. The WA Pearl Producers Association and WorkSafe have been contacted for comment. Source: http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-02-22/paspaley-pearl-diver-jarrod-hampton-family-welcomes-inquest-wa/8292170 Feb 22 2017
  18. Wow - if there was enough gas released to cause vessel stability issues, that was no minor release. That makes it even more of a miracle that there was not multiple fatalities. I'll be watching also to see if there is an IMCA Safety Flash on this. Tell me Derek, was it a surface oriented or sat job?
  19. I will quote John Jenco here, a good diver to work with! “From a safety standpoint, the first line of defense is, and always has been, the diver. For the FNGs, a word of wisdom hard won: Commercial diving will NEVER be a SAFE profession; the best that can be hoped for is that YOU and your brothers in the diving community can make it SAFER. So BE ADVISED, commercial diving is not a game or thrilling profession. Understand that you can get killed or maimed doing this shit. Own that, and act accordingly. Every time. The second lines of defense are your tender, standby diver, bell partner, or topside supervisor, depending upon the situation. They are your ONLY backup safety system that you can rely upon when your shit goes sideways, so choose wisely. Taking a stand on WHO you will work with - and most importantly, who you won't - may save your life or someone else one day. Understand that as well. If you allow yourself to work with the lazy, careless, nervous, or unreliable, it is YOU that may have to pay the price for your lack of judgment someday, for not wanting to offend anyone. Finally, I know guys that died in 5' of water, and 500' of water. NO JOB is too simple to take safety for granted. If you want to survive in this profession, you had better learn to lock down all the BS and grab-ass and leave it on the beach. Get your frogman on from the time you leave the dock until the time you return. Assume nothing and take nothing for granted. Know your job and make certain that everyone else has done theirs as well, because if a tender leaves a fitting loose or doesn't top off the air compressor, or the rack operator doesn't have the right gas mix lined out for your dive, or the supervisor doesn't have the best communications setup with the deck crews, YOU are the one that will likely pay the price for any screw ups resulting therefrom. Own that. Rant over. “ John Jenco The things we can control are basic and I know you have been on jobs where basics are shoddy at best. 1) Hose Management both surface and saturation diving (We are sloppy about it) 2) Safety meetings, Diving Safety Drills, JSAs. (Informing everyone what is going on! I hate canned JSAs, if they don't do drills at least walk through it and have it planned out) 3) Surface Diving Chamber Operation. (proper vents, walking away from the chamber to wash divers gear and not looking at the diver through porthole) 4) Fully Dressed Stand By Diver (No Excuse) 5) LEARN TO SAY NO (quit being afraid to offend anyone) In short man or woman UP! I have never understood a person that has the courage to dive but not the courage to say NO!
  20. It's not on anyone else when one of us dies but us. It doesn't cost the company that cut corners on the their job plan, their life. It doesn't cost the company you're working for, that made the cheapest bid, to get the poorly planed job, their life. It is the guy doing the job and remember you took the job. I will quote John Jenco here a good diver to work with here: “From a safety standpoint, the first line of defense is, and always has been, the diver. For the FNGs, a word of wisdom hard won: Commercial diving will NEVER be a SAFE profession; the best that can be hoped for is that YOU and your brothers in the diving community can make it SAFER. So BE ADVISED, commercial diving is not a game or thrilling profession. Understand that you can get killed or maimed doing this shit. Own that, and act accordingly. Every time. The second lines of defense are your tender, standby diver, bell partner, or topside supervisor, depending upon the situation. They are your ONLY backup safety system that you can rely upon when your shit goes sideways, so choose wisely. Taking a stand on WHO you will work with - and most importantly, who you won't - may save your life or someone else one day. Understand that as well. If you allow yourself to work with the lazy, careless, nervous, or unreliable, it is YOU that may have to pay the price for your lack of judgment someday, for not wanting to offend anyone. Finally, I know guys that died in 5' of water, and 500' of water. NO JOB is too simple to take safety for granted. If you want to survive in this profession, you had better learn to lock down all the BS and grab-ass and leave it on the beach. Get your frogman on from the time you leave the dock until the time you return. Assume nothing and take nothing for granted. Know your job and make certain that everyone else has done theirs as well, because if a tender leaves a fitting loose or doesn't top off the air compressor, or the rack operator doesn't have the right gas mix lined out for your dive, or the supervisor doesn't have the best communications setup with the deck crews, YOU are the one that will likely pay the price for any screw ups resulting therefrom. Own that. Rant over. “ John Jenco The things we can control are basic and I know you have been on jobs where basics are shoddy at best. 1) Hose Management both surface and saturation diving (We are sloppy about it) 2) Safety meetings, Diving Safety Drills, JSAs. (Informing everyone what is going on! I hate canned JSAs, if they don't do drills at least walk through it and have it planned out) 3) Surface Diving Chamber Operation. (proper vents, walking away from the chamber to wash divers gear and not looking at the diver through porthole) 4) Fully Dressed Stand By Diver (No Excuse) 5) LEARN TO SAY NO (quit being afraid to offend anyone) In short man or woman UP! I have never understood a person that has the courage to dive but not the courage to say NO!
  21. Very lucky- could have been much worse.. http://www.professionalmariner.com/May-2008/Explosion-kills-three-from-dive-boat-decommissioning-gas-pipeline/
  22. I have seen a recording of the incident and I won’t release the recording so as not to identify the sender. In my opinion the leak was so great the sea was bubbling up metres above the water and had the potential to cause the vessel severe stability issues. I'd be interested to see if this IMCA member company do report the incident.
  23. This incident sounds like it had the potential for multiple casualties / fatalities. Glad it did not turn out that way. Now let's just hope that the contractor and the oil company both learn from this incident and perform a proper LOTO in the future.
  24. Getting information of an incident off Iran possibly on the Optimus (ex-Acergy Harrier). Company I’m told is the MEDS from the Middle East. Job was undertaking a repair on a damaged 32” pipeline involving tying in a new spool to an existing pipeline flange. Incident involved a serious loss of gas via the open pipeline with the resultant release of small quantities of H2S whilst the two divers were in the water and the vessel was attached to the spools and pipeline by 2 x cranes meaning the vessel was unable to move off location. It is suspected the refinery opened a valve and sent the gas down the pipeline. The H2S wasn’t of sufficient quantity to cause respiratory incidents other than the foul smell it dissipates but the significant gas release from the pipeline caused a lot of persons to be alarmed when the abandon ship alarm sounded. I am led to believe the incident was eventually brought under control with no loss of life and luckily the gas did not reach an ignition source.
  25. So all are clear. At the meeting will be Representatives of the Rod & Torch Manufactures, ADCI, IMCA, and several Diving Companies.
  26. There would be two vital areas of importance that would be the focus of this undertaking; 1. Safety 2. Competency Training would be conducted at the DCBC accredited CDT commercial diver training facility in Hudson FL. and consist of two primary components; 1. Underwater burning certification 2. Underwater Oxy-Arc Burning Instructor certification. (This would be required to conduct training of personal) John Roat and CDT will be holding meetings during the upcoming UI Conference in New Orleans. If those attending the meetings agree this course will be offered to other Accredited Diver Training Schools. Interested parties can contact Sid Preskitt, Commercial Diving Technologies at 321-212-8550 or underseas6@yahoo.com for more information. You can download a short Video overview by clicking on Burning: BurningTraining.wmv
  27. Commercial Diving Technologies, LLC (CDT) is engaged in talks with John Roat, JCRoat Subject Matter Expert Services to develop a stand alone underwater burning training course. There would be two vital areas of importance that would be the focus of this undertaking; 1. Safety 2. Competency Training would be conducted at the DCBC accredited CDT commercial diver training facility in Hudson FL. and consist of two primary components; 1. Underwater burning certification 2. Underwater Oxy-Arc Burning Instructor certification. (This would be required to conduct training of personal) John Roat and CDT will be holding meetings during the upcoming UI Conference in New Orleans. If those attending the meetings agree this course will be offered to other Accredited Diver Training Schools. Interested parties can contact Sid Preskitt, Commercial Diving Technologies at 321-212-8550 or underseas6@yahoo.com for more information.
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