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  1. Yesterday
  2. Nothing I wrote in that article has changed, except, all the experienced dive personnel we have lost from this industry. (SEE That Article here) I believe we have reached the bottom of the worst Famine Time I have been through since coming into the Oil patch in 1969. My biggest fear is another major event such as our Twin Hurricanes anywhere in a major oil field on this earth. We do not have the experienced Dive personal, up to date DSV's or the tools ready to handle that. The history of these type events that we have been through many times is: Our customers just want their problem cured, whatever work rules they have, are out the window. So what do we do? It is on us, the Dive Supervisor, not the Designated person-in-charge (DPIC), the Project manager anyone else, not even the diver. Our number one job is to get them down and back safely out of the chamber. So whether anyone else on the job or in the office likes it we, the guys sitting in that chair, have to be willing to shut it down. You can almost hear the old movie theme from Jaws, playing in the back ground. I do hope this Famine doesn't end like so many in the past have, instant FEAST! PS: An important message to Management. You do not build an Effective, Safe, Team by surrounding yourself with people afraid to tell you the truth or are just plain liars, cover their own butts types!
  3. In November 2005 I wrote an article for Offshore Diver called FEAST Time. There was more work than we could possibly do. We had had the Twin hurricanes, divers from all over the world were working in the GOM. There was more work than we had trained commercials divers for. A quote from that article to start this one: “To the loved ones and dive team members of the three young men we have lost recently there is little we can say that will help you. What we can do is make it a better business, which may help your soul a little and the rest of us a lot. The best safety out there is watching each other’s backs. The Coast Guard and OSHA show up after the fact, neither the ADC or IMCA have any enforcement mechanism and they damn well don't want one either.” Nothing I wrote in that article has changed, except, all the experienced dive personnel we have lost from this industry. (SEE That Article here) I believe we have reached the bottom of the worst Famine Time I have been through since coming into the Oil patch in 1969. My biggest fear is another major event such as our Twin Hurricanes anywhere in a major oil field on this earth. We do not have the experienced Dive personal, up to date DSV's or the tools ready to handle that. The history of these type events that we have been through many times is: Our customers just want their problem cured, whatever work rules they have, are out the window. So what do we do? It is on us, the Dive Supervisor, not the Designated person-in-charge (DPIC), the Project manager anyone else, not even the diver. Our number one job is to get them down and back safely out of the chamber. So whether anyone else on the job or in the office likes it we, the guys sitting in that chair, have to be willing to shut it down. You can almost hear the old movie theme from jaws playing in the back ground. I do hope this Famine doesn't end like so many in the past have, instant FEAST! PS; A little message to Management. You do not build an Effective, Safe, Team by surrounding yourself with people afraid to tell you the truth or are just plain liars, cover their own butts types!
  4. Last week
  5. Down Load PDF Divers Insurance2017b.pdf
  6. Busness Pics

    For Annoucments
  7. Version 1.0.0

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    Self Insurance for those working Free Lance.
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  9. Luke Seabrook, Canada, 2015

    I would say that yes, the power company are likely to be somewhat accountable. It is unlikely to be as clear cut as being wholly a diving company's fault, but more a combination of factors that contribute to an accident.
  10. Insurance Fisk Marine

    Version 1.0.0

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    Self-Insurance for Divers. Accident, Short Term Disability, Critical Illness w/Cancer, Whole Life Insurance.
  11. Billy Ray Lillard

    I didn't know Billy but he was liked and a young man I had put through dive school road the Chamber with Billy. Troy Turner he was a tender on the job. Just doing what the Dive Sup said like Billy.
  12. Luke Seabrook, Canada, 2015

    Ok guys, a question for you all. This is Luke's Mother. For anyone who has read the articles on his accident, I would like your input. Does anyone on this forum feel that the power company should have also been somewhat accountable for this? This was a regular check that apparently had been done times before. I realize the dive company is at fault for not doing a flow test. I am assuming they felt things were as always and never a problem before. Wrong, obviously but things I heard re the gate not closing and possibly why not closing this time due to new operator or debris keeping it open (and yet control room could not determine that flow was high). Should I just let it go (the contractor alone is charged) or should I push to have Labour Board reassess Power Company's contribution in this? Any input would be appreciated. Angela Seabrook Annapolis Generating Station Construction Project.pdf
  13. The never ending deaths of scuba divers who proclaim to be professional divers.

    The lack of care or concern from state and federal agencies to start enforcing the laws that keep people alive . It's never ending and down right frustrating to think that it's ok to be something your not. 

     

    THERE IS NO SUCH THING AS COMMERCIAL SCUBA DIVER. 

     

     

  14. OSHA Defends a Recreational Divers "Right" to claim Commercial Diver Status

    As you know Mr babin this has been a unsinkable ship scuba dummies trying to be professional divers . We can cry and bitch all we want but as long as the dollar rules the brain stupid there will always be. Keep your chin up and let's keep pounding away maybe some day we Will win this war
  15. As much as you are going to hate to hear this, technically anyone who is paid to perform work underwater (whether using copper hat, superlite, or a snorkel) is in fact a commercial diver. The word "commercial" implies that the task is performed for pay (commerce) and does not stipulate the quality of work, whether it is the exclusive profession of the individual, or the method by which it is performed. A professional diver is one who works as a diver exclusively and does no other work. The term professional is also often used to convey the idea of a job done properly. Competitors hiring untrained inexperienced divers and using SCUBA or Hookah were always a constant source of frustration to me when I operated my own business. I found that on the difficult jobs you never saw them, but on the easy cream jobs they were all over them like ants at a picnic. To demonstrate the difference, I always used to refer to real divers as "commercial industrial divers", and those who worked in SCUBA as "hobby divers" which seemed to better separate the real divers from the recreational divers. I wish I knew a magic fix to pass on to you, but education of the clients is the only thing that will work. ADCI used to have educational material available to pass out to clients, and that did seem to help somewhat. The other answer I found was to stick to deep work that required the chamber and that tended to thin out the recreational crowd.
  16. I have been in or near this industry for over 30 years. This past year everything I have ever known or taught to be true has been thrown into the can by OSHA! In Sept of 2016 I was goaded into contacting OSHA by an overly inexperienced "safety general foreman" (intentionally not capitalized to emphasize the lack of knowledge he really has regarding this industry). Flashback to February 2014 I reported to the safety department that their use of recreational divers not only violated 29 CFR(on various extreme levels) it also was against the law on every level for them to be "Recreational working" in a SHIP YARD! I was chewed by an individual and his flunkies for speaking out of my pay grade (uhhummmm - Retired Marine, Carded and active Commercial Diver Trainer, DSO, Business Owner)! I was assigned to second shift until February 2015 ( so the illegals could dive without being documented). Feb2015 I was reassigned as Services Manager to one of the ships I build from pallets into the modules that become an LCS (Littoral Combat Ship). I gave Sec Nav Mabus and Lt Cmdr. A. Gold my word I would let no harm come to these ships or the men and women building them during my tour. Fincaniteri Marinette Marine has other agendas... Money cheapest cost available yada,yada,yada! Ship manager a retired Navy Lt Cmdr. (whom I cannot name) gave a similar order "Keep My Ship" (for non vets let no harm or damage come to this vessel while you are on deck). We launch in July 2016 this arrogant "Master Scuba Diver" has the wads to ask how I like his little operation - I inform him in true Marine Corps Fashion of the illegality and uninsurable danger his presence has brought to my deck - he scrambles off like a wounded rat and cries victim to Sr. Management. Sept 2016 I have had enough and the door opens to contact OSHA; I do, I am barred from my ship, the investigation, the reporting, he is fined, and back at work the following day! OSHA's Statement: (in short) Victim Diving company allowed to site ADCI regulations allowing the use of SCUBA Interpret OSHA Regulations to investigators (that were clueless by their own admission)...Victime Diving Company fined for not having COmmercial Regs in their Safety Plan ( I wonder why that was - maybe because if they were correctly credentialed It would have already been there) THE END! Additionally the yard can and may hire whom ever they chose to perform any services required... 26May2017 I resigned my post, for these issues and denied unemployment. SHipyard defending their OSHA given right to employ PADI Divers to perform COMMERCIAL Diving Work! What in Poseidon's Name has our industry come to? Anyone want to get involved here? Now outside the yard and the only FBO, GSA recognized Commercial Diving Company within 260 Radial Miles of the Gate I am now legally in competition with a SCUBA Store for work in my craft... Comments and reactions please!
  17. Billy Ray Lillard

    Thank you for posting that, John, yet another forgotten incident. And a stark reminder that behind every fatality there is a family tragedy:- Billy Ray Lillard, born 1966, married Fiancée Jerolyn in 1990, died in 1991, he was aged just 25. As Mark says - What a waste of a life
  18. Fabulous, thank you for your kind offer John! It is set, initially, in the sub-tropical latitudes, roughly parallel with Sao Paulo, in Februrary, so it is warm! Can I email you it as a PDF or Word doc? Tom
  19. Tom; I am willing to take a look. What part of this world is the Fictional incident/death taking place?
  20. Hi there Please excuse my blundering in here as a non-diver, but I have been interested in the safety concerns you discuss here as the subject matter for a specific chapter in my forthcoming novel. I would like to ask if one of you guys would care to comment on the technical aspects of this chapter, to help me achieve a credible level of accuracy (within the limits of creative license). The chapter concerns a (fictional) diving fatality using surface-supplied air while working at a dam, in a delta-p scenario. I only need technical comments on the one chapter, length under 4,000 words, and in return I would be happy to offer a free "review" copy of the finished article when it comes out, hopefully later this year. Many thanks in anticipation Tom Dawn
  21. My YouTube Oxy-Arc Burning Page is coming together. It is Videos, currently, 7 teaching tools from the Instructors Guide for Ocean Technology Oxy-Arc Underwater Burning Manual Rev. 1: Ps Read the captions below the video.
  22. Those who have died

    This album is just for pictures of divers who have died while working. We don't want anyone to forget.
  23. Kevin S Sass, GOM, 1995

    The following is part of an email received regarding this incident. Other parts have been removed to protect the identity of the emailer: “At the time of his death, Kevin had been on a jetting job. They were either searching for a pipe or a valve. I do not recall the location. The trench had been jetted out 20 or so feet below natural bottom. It had not been done very well because they had already experienced some collapses of the wall on either side during the operation. At some point during Kevin's dive he experienced a collapse that resulted in his being completely buried. Under most circumstances this would not be an issue. One merely "jets" themselves out of the hole and then re-jets the collapsed portion of the trench. Unfortunately, Kevin broke the cardinal rule for jet blasting. He failed to secure the jet nozzle to his wrist with some polyline. The shock of being struck by the collapse caused him to drop the jet nozzle and it subsequently jetted itself away from him. Two standby divers were utilized to attempt a rescue but were unsuccessful as the material filled in faster than they could jet it away. Kevin was conscious and speaking for a time, but when he finally stopped responding it was decided to "yank" him forcibly out of the trench. Kevin's umbilical was attached to the crane hook and he was pulled out of the hole. It is a little fuzzy here what happened when they got him to the surface but all attempts at first aid failed. One point that stuck out was that upon pulling him out of the hole with the crane, his umbilical slipped through the seizing at the QD and subsequently pulled his head down almost to the QD resulting in a broken neck. Whether or not Kevin was still alive at that point can only be speculated without an autopsy report and I am not aware that one was ever made public. Needless to say, had he still been alive at the time of being "yanked" out of the hole, he certainly would not have been after that. I am certain that if pursued, an autopsy report could reveal the actual cause of death, but this highlights how important it is to pay attention to the little things. For the want of a four foot piece of polyline, my friend lost his life, I lost a friend, a family lost a fine son, and a fiancé lost a husband.”
  24. Billy Ray Lillard

    What a waste of life! Why I hate Surface Gas. Unfortunately with the continued low oil price, I can see clients bringing back SMG as a cheaper option to Sat. I would expect an increase in accidents and fatalities if it does.
  25. Charges laid in death of Nova Scotia diver

    Unfortunately the Power Company was not charged! In my humble opinion this charge to a small Dive company will change nothing! It will all be forgotten in a couple months and a new small, ill equipped dive company will come along and take their place. We need the big Corp's that hire them for convenience and cost cutting reasons to be held accountable. This is will help get the recognition that the dive industry's safety needs, before any real change is made. I realize due diligence was not done by Paul's Diving but I still fail to understand how the power company's indicators showed gate closed when they were not clearly closed properly. Could the power company not also tell there was more than usual flow for a closed gate at the main control room? I thought these indicators were able to asses flow. How else does company know when and where to control gates for tides? Labour board can still not tell us what and why this happened!!!!!! Any ideas on what can be done? brookleasea@yahoo.com Angela Seabrook
  26. Two years to the day after the death of Luke Seabrook, charges have been laid in his death. http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nova-scotia/safety-violations-diver-death-nova-scotia-power-tidal-plant-1.4206991
  27. Luke Seabrook, Canada, 2015

    Safety violations laid in diver's death at Nova Scotia Power plant Luke Seabrook, 39, died in 2 years ago today after getting stuck underwater in a sluice gate By Elizabeth Chiu, CBC News Posted: Jul 15, 2017 2:45 PM AT Last Updated: Jul 15, 2017 2:45 PM AT A small commercial diving company in Hammonds Plains, N.S., has been charged with four offences under the province's Occupational Health and Safety Act following the death of an employee two years ago today. Luke Seabrook died on July 15, 2015 after getting stuck underwater in a sluice gate at the Nova Scotia Power tidal plant in Annapolis Royal. The 39-year-old commercial diver from Dartmouth was working for a company hired by the utility to inspect the gates controlling the flow of the powerful tides of the Annapolis River. 4 charges According to court documents, Paul's Diving Services Inc. is alleged to have: failed to provide information, instruction, training, and supervision necessary to address water flow hazards at the tidal generating station; failed to take precautions "to ensure that employees, and particularly the supervisors and foremen were made familiar with... hazardous water pressure differential that may exist at the sluice gates"; failed to ensure a written dive plan was in place that met the requirements of the province's Occupational Diving Regulations; failed to ensure that a dive was not conducted in hazardous water-flow conditions. The charges have not been proven in court. A representative of the company is due in Digby provincial court on July 24 to enter a plea. An official from the company declined to comment on the matter, when reached by phone Saturday. If convicted, penalties could include a fine as high as $500,000, up to two years in jail, or both a fine and a jail term. Seabrook's family was told the gate was not fully closed and powerful water pressure sucked him into the gap. His helmet was wedged in the opening, trapping him underwater. Charging 'the little guy' The province has up to two years to investigate and lay charges in workplace incidents. Seabrook's family and diving safety advocates have been raising the case as a "catalyst for change." In a letter emailed in May to provincial officials, including Premier Stephen McNeil, the family urged the province to consider laying charges against Nova Scotia Power Seabrook's mother Angela Seabrook said she feared labour officials might be "apprehensive about laying charges further up the line" and that the Occupational Health and Safety Branch had not fulfilled its mandate for workplace safety "based on the decision to only charge the little guy." "Too many large corporations escape being held accountable for hiring third-party contractors," she said. 'No evidence' against NSP The province disputed that. Daniel McNeil, a spokesperson for the Labour Department, said "no evidence was gathered to support laying charges against Nova Scotia Power Inc." For its part, Nova Scotia Power spokesperson Tiffany Chase said in an email that Seabrook's death was a "terrible tragedy. Our thoughts are with his family. Workplace safety is integral to our corporate culture." The CEO of the Diver Certification Board of Canada, David Parkes, said he agreed that Nova Scotia should not be charged because the utility was not Seabrook's employer. 'Slight improvement' Parkes said he expects only a "slight improvement" in the commercial diving world as a result of the charges. He said diving contractors will be "more and more conscious on doing things like dive plans, taking a better job safety analysis before they start work." He said Nova Scotia lags behind New Brunswick, which has trained nine general inspectors in diving issues since the accident. Parkes said he would like to see Nova Scotia adopt regulations that require contractors to notify the Labour Department 24 hours in advance of a dive project. That's the law in Ontario and British Columbia. Steve Donovan, a diving safety expert, said relying solely on regulations isn't the answer. He said it's up to commercial diving contractors to adopt best practices to ensure a diver's safety. Taken from: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nova-scotia/safety-violations-diver-death-nova-scotia-power-tidal-plant-1.4206991
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