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  1. Yesterday
  2. Paspaley pearl diver Jarrod Hampton's family seeking answers as inquest into death set down for May The family of a Victorian pearl diver who died off WA's north-west coast has welcomed the scheduling of an inquest five years on, saying lives continued to be put at risk by alleged dubious safety practices. Jarrod Hampton was working as a drift diver for the Paspaley Pearling Company in April 2012 when he got into trouble in the water off Eighty Mile Beach. By the time he was pulled aboard his boat, its crew was unable to revive him. A 10-day coronial inquest has now been set down to run in Perth in May, with Mr Hampton's parents Robyn and Tony and their two other sons planning to travel from their home in Victoria to attend. Ms Hampton welcomed the announcement of the inquest and said she felt "very optimistic". "We've waited many years to get that news. There was a time we thought we weren't going to get an inquest," she said. "We will learn what they did do and what they perhaps should have done, and what maybe should have been in place." Ms Hampton said the doubt surrounding just how her son died had added to the family's distress. "We only live with the memories of him, and we miss him, and the dynamics of our family have changed forever ... we're overwhelmed by his loss," she said. Family criticises 'archaic' regulations In the wake of the death, safety watchdog WorkSafe charged Paspaley with failing to provide a safe work environment, to which the company pleaded guilty and was fined $60,000. The Broome District Court heard it took the Paspaley crew between five and 10 minutes to bring Mr Hampton onto a boat, at which time efforts to revive him were unsuccessful. However, no charge was ever laid relation to Mr Hampton's death, and there has been no suggestion the company was responsible. The Hampton family has been scathing of the relatively loose regulation of the pearling industry and the lack of change in the wake of their son's death. "There's been no significant improvements, nothing done that would protect someone's life," Ms Hampton said. Pearl diving is regulated under the general diving regulations rather than commercial diving regulations, and Ms Hampton said the inquest would provide an opportunity to have that reviewed. "All the pearl divers must get a commercial fishing licence, so the WA state does see their job as commercial fishing, and yet they've managed to maintain a very archaic diving regulation, the general diving regulations." Review underway but progress unclear Both Paspaley and the WA Pearl Producers Association have defended the industry's safety record, pointing out that deaths are very rare and saying improvements had been made in recent years. The State Government said in the wake of Mr Hampton's death that it would review safety regulations, but it appears there has been little progress. A working group was formed by WorkSafe after court proceedings finished in 2015 to assess what industry changes were needed. The ABC understands the group has met several times, and is looking at whether the existing non-enforceable industry code of practice needs to be upgraded to a commission code. Diving guidelines are also being reviewed nationally, a process Worksafe has said could have implications for the training requirements in WA's pearling industry. The WA Pearl Producers Association and WorkSafe have been contacted for comment. Source: http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-02-22/paspaley-pearl-diver-jarrod-hampton-family-welcomes-inquest-wa/8292170 Feb 22 2017
  3. Last week
  4. Wow - if there was enough gas released to cause vessel stability issues, that was no minor release. That makes it even more of a miracle that there was not multiple fatalities. I'll be watching also to see if there is an IMCA Safety Flash on this. Tell me Derek, was it a surface oriented or sat job?
  5. never scuba QEPD
  6. I will quote John Jenco here, a good diver to work with! “From a safety standpoint, the first line of defense is, and always has been, the diver. For the FNGs, a word of wisdom hard won: Commercial diving will NEVER be a SAFE profession; the best that can be hoped for is that YOU and your brothers in the diving community can make it SAFER. So BE ADVISED, commercial diving is not a game or thrilling profession. Understand that you can get killed or maimed doing this shit. Own that, and act accordingly. Every time. The second lines of defense are your tender, standby diver, bell partner, or topside supervisor, depending upon the situation. They are your ONLY backup safety system that you can rely upon when your shit goes sideways, so choose wisely. Taking a stand on WHO you will work with - and most importantly, who you won't - may save your life or someone else one day. Understand that as well. If you allow yourself to work with the lazy, careless, nervous, or unreliable, it is YOU that may have to pay the price for your lack of judgment someday, for not wanting to offend anyone. Finally, I know guys that died in 5' of water, and 500' of water. NO JOB is too simple to take safety for granted. If you want to survive in this profession, you had better learn to lock down all the BS and grab-ass and leave it on the beach. Get your frogman on from the time you leave the dock until the time you return. Assume nothing and take nothing for granted. Know your job and make certain that everyone else has done theirs as well, because if a tender leaves a fitting loose or doesn't top off the air compressor, or the rack operator doesn't have the right gas mix lined out for your dive, or the supervisor doesn't have the best communications setup with the deck crews, YOU are the one that will likely pay the price for any screw ups resulting therefrom. Own that. Rant over. “ John Jenco The things we can control are basic and I know you have been on jobs where basics are shoddy at best. 1) Hose Management both surface and saturation diving (We are sloppy about it) 2) Safety meetings, Diving Safety Drills, JSAs. (Informing everyone what is going on! I hate canned JSAs, if they don't do drills at least walk through it and have it planned out) 3) Surface Diving Chamber Operation. (proper vents, walking away from the chamber to wash divers gear and not looking at the diver through porthole) 4) Fully Dressed Stand By Diver (No Excuse) 5) LEARN TO SAY NO (quit being afraid to offend anyone) In short man or woman UP! I have never understood a person that has the courage to dive but not the courage to say NO!
  7. It's not on anyone else when one of us dies but us. It doesn't cost the company that cut corners on the their job plan, their life. It doesn't cost the company you're working for, that made the cheapest bid, to get the poorly planed job, their life. It is the guy doing the job and remember you took the job. I will quote John Jenco here a good diver to work with here: “From a safety standpoint, the first line of defense is, and always has been, the diver. For the FNGs, a word of wisdom hard won: Commercial diving will NEVER be a SAFE profession; the best that can be hoped for is that YOU and your brothers in the diving community can make it SAFER. So BE ADVISED, commercial diving is not a game or thrilling profession. Understand that you can get killed or maimed doing this shit. Own that, and act accordingly. Every time. The second lines of defense are your tender, standby diver, bell partner, or topside supervisor, depending upon the situation. They are your ONLY backup safety system that you can rely upon when your shit goes sideways, so choose wisely. Taking a stand on WHO you will work with - and most importantly, who you won't - may save your life or someone else one day. Understand that as well. If you allow yourself to work with the lazy, careless, nervous, or unreliable, it is YOU that may have to pay the price for your lack of judgment someday, for not wanting to offend anyone. Finally, I know guys that died in 5' of water, and 500' of water. NO JOB is too simple to take safety for granted. If you want to survive in this profession, you had better learn to lock down all the BS and grab-ass and leave it on the beach. Get your frogman on from the time you leave the dock until the time you return. Assume nothing and take nothing for granted. Know your job and make certain that everyone else has done theirs as well, because if a tender leaves a fitting loose or doesn't top off the air compressor, or the rack operator doesn't have the right gas mix lined out for your dive, or the supervisor doesn't have the best communications setup with the deck crews, YOU are the one that will likely pay the price for any screw ups resulting therefrom. Own that. Rant over. “ John Jenco The things we can control are basic and I know you have been on jobs where basics are shoddy at best. 1) Hose Management both surface and saturation diving (We are sloppy about it) 2) Safety meetings, Diving Safety Drills, JSAs. (Informing everyone what is going on! I hate canned JSAs, if they don't do drills at least walk through it and have it planned out) 3) Surface Diving Chamber Operation. (proper vents, walking away from the chamber to wash divers gear and not looking at the diver through porthole) 4) Fully Dressed Stand By Diver (No Excuse) 5) LEARN TO SAY NO (quit being afraid to offend anyone) In short man or woman UP! I have never understood a person that has the courage to dive but not the courage to say NO!
  8. Very lucky- could have been much worse.. http://www.professionalmariner.com/May-2008/Explosion-kills-three-from-dive-boat-decommissioning-gas-pipeline/
  9. I have seen a recording of the incident and I won’t release the recording so as not to identify the sender. In my opinion the leak was so great the sea was bubbling up metres above the water and had the potential to cause the vessel severe stability issues. I'd be interested to see if this IMCA member company do report the incident.
  10. This incident sounds like it had the potential for multiple casualties / fatalities. Glad it did not turn out that way. Now let's just hope that the contractor and the oil company both learn from this incident and perform a proper LOTO in the future.
  11. Getting information of an incident off Iran possibly on the Optimus (ex-Acergy Harrier). Company I’m told is the MEDS from the Middle East. Job was undertaking a repair on a damaged 32” pipeline involving tying in a new spool to an existing pipeline flange. Incident involved a serious loss of gas via the open pipeline with the resultant release of small quantities of H2S whilst the two divers were in the water and the vessel was attached to the spools and pipeline by 2 x cranes meaning the vessel was unable to move off location. It is suspected the refinery opened a valve and sent the gas down the pipeline. The H2S wasn’t of sufficient quantity to cause respiratory incidents other than the foul smell it dissipates but the significant gas release from the pipeline caused a lot of persons to be alarmed when the abandon ship alarm sounded. I am led to believe the incident was eventually brought under control with no loss of life and luckily the gas did not reach an ignition source.
  12. Earlier
  13. So all are clear. At the meeting will be Representatives of the Rod & Torch Manufactures, ADCI, IMCA, and several Diving Companies.
  14. There would be two vital areas of importance that would be the focus of this undertaking; 1. Safety 2. Competency Training would be conducted at the DCBC accredited CDT commercial diver training facility in Hudson FL. and consist of two primary components; 1. Underwater burning certification 2. Underwater Oxy-Arc Burning Instructor certification. (This would be required to conduct training of personal) John Roat and CDT will be holding meetings during the upcoming UI Conference in New Orleans. If those attending the meetings agree this course will be offered to other Accredited Diver Training Schools. Interested parties can contact Sid Preskitt, Commercial Diving Technologies at 321-212-8550 or underseas6@yahoo.com for more information. You can download a short Video overview by clicking on Burning: BurningTraining.wmv
  15. Commercial Diving Technologies, LLC (CDT) is engaged in talks with John Roat, JCRoat Subject Matter Expert Services to develop a stand alone underwater burning training course. There would be two vital areas of importance that would be the focus of this undertaking; 1. Safety 2. Competency Training would be conducted at the DCBC accredited CDT commercial diver training facility in Hudson FL. and consist of two primary components; 1. Underwater burning certification 2. Underwater Oxy-Arc Burning Instructor certification. (This would be required to conduct training of personal) John Roat and CDT will be holding meetings during the upcoming UI Conference in New Orleans. If those attending the meetings agree this course will be offered to other Accredited Diver Training Schools. Interested parties can contact Sid Preskitt, Commercial Diving Technologies at 321-212-8550 or underseas6@yahoo.com for more information.
  16. This year the Canadian Underwater Conference and Exhibition is in the nation's capital, Ottawa. The link to the website is http://www.underwaterconference.ca/
  17. Still no action The Divers Association urges every interested person to contact the Coast Guard, their governmental representatives and every active company in the Diving industry. The anticipated changes won’t revolutionize anything. All of the proposals are already accepted or exceeded by the professional associations in the United States and IMCA. Mr. Jeffery G. Lantz Director of Commercial Regulations & Standards (CG-5PS) U.S. Coast Guard Headquarters 2703 Martin Luther King Jr. Ave SE, STOP 7126 Washington, DC 20593-7126 202-372-1351 E-Mail Jeffry G. Lantz <Jeffrey.G.Lantz@uscg.mil> Mr. Ken Smith Project Manager Department of Homeland Security U.S. Coast Guard Commandant (CG-OES-2), 2703 Martin Luther King Jr. Avenue SE., STOP 7509, Washington, DC 20593-7509 Phone: 202 372-1413 E-Mail: ken.a.smith@uscg.mil For United Citizens you will find your Representative here Just enter you zip code it wll give you the hotlink to their Web page I am telling mine this " No result in more then 18 years! CHANGES TO CFRs ARE IN BUREAUCRATIC LIMBO and causing the loss of divers lives. You can find evidence of the lack of action here"
  18. As usual ADCI Current Cardholders are admitted to the display floor no charge. If you have your card make sure to bring it! You will find all information on presentations, hotels and sign up for Underwater Intervention 2017 here!
  19. Taken from: http://www.cbc.ca/beta/news/canada/nova-scotia/luke-seabrook-diving-death-accident-tidal-power-plant-1.3678009 No closure for family of diver killed at Nova Scotia tidal plant a year ago Luke Seabrook's family on mission to prevent divers from dying on the job The family of a Dartmouth man killed on the job at Nova Scotia Power's Annapolis Tidal Power Plant a year ago is still seeking answers about how and why his death happened. Commercial diver Luke Seabrook, 39, died last July 15 while inspecting the dam's underwater gates. The generating station is located where the powerful Bay of Fundy tides meet the Annapolis River in Annapolis Royal. "He didn't have a hope in hell, nobody would," said Angela Seabrook, Luke's mother, as she stared at the rushing water pouring out of the dam. The Wasaga Beach, Ont., woman travelled to Nova Scotia to see the plant for herself on the eve of the anniversary. 'I need to know' "I have to find out what happened and why it happened before I can forgive," she said. "There might not be anybody to blame for this. It could just be an accident, but I need to know." His family has received details from Jarvis DesRoche, the backup diver, who along with the diver supervisor, were providing support from the shore. Luke Seabrook was carrying out the annual inspection of the gate as part of Paul's Diving Service Inc. It was a job he'd done before. Within a minute or two of going underwater, Seabrook signalled to come up. His support team couldn't pull him up but the line wouldn't budge, so they tied off his line in hopes he wouldn't be dragged farther away. "If Jarvis had gone down, there would be two of them dead," Angela Seabrook said. DesRoche had to wait about an hour for the tides on both sides of the dam gate to equalize before he could retrieve his friend's body. Seabrook says her son was found stuck in the gate, which wasn't fully closed, as it should have been. His helmet was wedged in the gap. The opening allowed the force of the world's highest tides to surge through. The differential pressure on either side of the gate creates a powerful suction. That pressure can be in the tonnes. In the diving world, that hazard is called Delta P, and it's one of the leading causes of death for occupational divers. 'I hope he didn't suffer' Luke Seabrook was found with broken ribs and contusions to his head. His suit was ripped, his mouthpiece was loose. "I don't know whether he died because his lungs were crushed or he drowned," Angela Seabrook said. She's still waiting for the autopsy report's official cause of death. "All I know is I hope he didn't suffer." For the last year, the provincial department of Labour has been investigating the workplace fatality. It typically takes two years before findings are released and charges, if warranted, are laid. Seabrook's fear is that another diver could die on the job in the meantime. Department denies CBC request CBC News has asked to see the department's stop-work and compliance orders slapped on Nova Scotia Power and Paul's Diving Service Inc. Those requests have been denied, and that decision is waiting to be reviewed. Rejecting a request for labour department orders is unusual. In previous cases, the department has provided the information to CBC News. Nova Scotia Power has declined an interview. And the dive support team members have not responded to an interview request. 'Things haven't changed' Seabrook has enlisted the help of diving expert Stephen Donovan in her quest for answers. In the '90s, Donovan was a member of the working group that drafted Nova Scotia's diving regulations. He says he walked away from the group because it was split with infighting among different diving groups that had competing interests. The end result, he says, was watered-down regulations. "Things haven't changed from when I was diving in the Bay of Fundy in the middle of the '70s," said Donovan. "Yes, we have better equipment but we still are losing people." Donovan finds it deeply troubling that Luke Seabrook was likely killed because of a danger that is nothing new – differential pressure at a dam. He says he believes Seabrook's death was preventable. It's high time, he says, for the diving community to make safety a priority. "Very frustrating that changes haven't been made that I think should've been made." 'We feel forgotten' The wait for information has been agonizing for Seabrook's widow, Sheryl. They were newlyweds when Luke was killed. His last text was haunting and sweet. "Going to work with the changing tides. I love you, I'll talk to you soon," she recalled. The 36-year-old has tried to go back to work, but she's been unsuccessful. Diving was a passion she shared with her husband, but now she can't go back in the water. On this first anniversary of Seabrook's death, she plans to go to the plant for the first time where she'll spend time in quiet meditation. She'll find a wreath attached to a chain link fence surrounding the dam. It's the only hint of the tragedy. But there will be no closure. "I think that's something that can only come after the full investigation is disclosed to us, if and when," she said. "We feel forgotten."
  20. SPAIN HAS VERY GOOD REGULATION OF DIVING... HERE AS ELSEWHERE, NOTHING HAPPENS
  21. A few years back? that is so like yesterday when it comes to Government agencies committing to “do the right thing”. Here in the US the USCG has been promising to create that safer work place now for twenty years. Guess it does not matter which side of the pond you are on, things just stay the same. Rest in peace Jesus and Agustin, may you be the last to die at the end of a hose this year or ever
  22. I had though that the petition to the European Diving Technical Committee a few years ago had resulted in both Spain and Italy promising to implement a safe commercial diving culture under LAW formulated by Spain. That was several years ago! Promises, Promises, Promises from the coffee shop!
  23. Professional Diving Safety is based on the behavior of Power, know and want to work safely We are angered by the continuous accidents in our activity and we ask ourselves among other questions why we assume that risk? Why do we dive well and not safely? We could fill a sea of justifications and we would not justify anything at all. Personally I do not think that it is only due to the bad regulation of a country, we are ourselves that opted to carry out unsecured operations. Until we assume our responsibility, accidents will continue.
  24. They seem to have one or two fatalities every year in Spain. This is terrible news.
  25. 2017 has started with two fatalities in the diving industry, both in Spain. The first was on January 5th was a diver named Jesus Ramon Vazquez Tojeiro, who was carrying out a dive to recover red coral, commonly used in jewelry that is sold in China. As the amount of red coral declines, divers have to go deeper to find it. This diver died while carrying out a SCUBA Mixed Gas dive. His body was recovered 9 days later on January 14th. The second diver died on 25th January. His name was Agustin Ortega. Currently we know very little about how he died, just that he was working at the Valdelentisco desalination plant near El Mojón in Mazarrón. It is widely recognised that Spain has one of the worst safety records in the world, and that their diving regulatory structure is antiquated, and totally inadequate for the diving industry. Lets hope that 2017 can be the start of a total restructuring of the Spanish diving regulations, as they sorely need it. Augustin Ortega
  26. Let us hope that the fatal accidents to finish
  27. See Attached IOGP Diving Safety Alert.docx
  28. From the album Those who have died

    Died 19th December 2016 Approx. 18:10 hs. Monday 19-Dec Commercial diver Leticia Castiglione, an Argentine. 37 years of age Diving for the Company Raul Negro. Operating in reflotamiebro on a sunken barge TAF 317. Km 1204,5 MI RP. Leaving bottom and arriving on the surface assisted by the two surface divers who with personal from the PNA used CPR. Unconscious she was transferred to land and taken to the School Hospital where they performed life saving tasks of reanimacion.amplia CORR Hs. At 20:20 The Head of Intensive Therapy reported the death of the Commercial Diver Leticia Castiglione, cause of death to be determined by the coroner. Federal Court Judgment No. 1 was given to Dr. Carlos Soto Dávila
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